Members Who Read Most Number Of Poems

Live Scores

Click here to see the rest of the list

Quotations From GEORGE ELIOT [MARY ANN (OR MARIAN) EVANS]

» More about George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] on Poemhunter

 

  • 21.
    Perhaps his might be one of the natures where a wise estimate of consequences is fused in the fires of that passionate belief which determines the consequences it believes in.
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist, editor. Daniel Deronda, bk. 6, ch. 41 (1876). Said of Mordecai; real name is Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans.
  • 22.
    There are characters which are continually creating collisions and nodes for themselves in dramas which nobody is prepared to act with them. Their susceptibilities will clash against objects that remain innocently quiet.
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist. Middlemarch, ch. 19 (1871-1872).
  • 23.
    ... the majority of us scarcely see more distinctly the faultiness of our own conduct than the faultiness of our own arguments, or the dulness [sic] of our own jokes.
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist. Middlemarch, ch. 18 (1871-1872).
  • 24.
    In spite of his practical ability, some of his experience had petrified into maxims and quotations.
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist, editor. Daniel Deronda, bk. 2, ch. 15 (1874-1876). Of the rector (Gwendolen Harleth's uncle); real name is Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans.
  • 25.
    It was not that she was out of temper, but that the world was not equal to the demands of her fine organism.
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist, editor. Daniel Deronda, bk. 1, ch. 7 (1876). Of Gwendolen Harleth.

    Read more quotations about / on: world
  • 26.
    There are some cases ... in which the sense of injury breeds—not the will to inflict injuries and climb over them as a ladder, but—a hatred of all injury.
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist, editor. Daniel Deronda, bk. 2, ch. 16 (1876).
  • 27.
    ... that softening influence of the fine arts which makes other people's hardships picturesque ...
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist. Middlemarch, ch. 39 (1871-1872).

    Read more quotations about / on: people
  • 28.
    Hostesses who entertain much must make up their parties as ministers make up their cabinets, on grounds other than personal liking.
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist, editor. Daniel Deronda, bk. 1, ch. 5 (1874-1876). Real name: Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans.
  • 29.
    There is hardly any contact more depressing to a young ardent creature than that of a mind in which years full of knowledge seem to have issued in a blank absence of interest or sympathy.
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist. Middlemarch, ch. 20 (1871-1872).

    Read more quotations about / on: sympathy
  • 30.
    ... in no part of the world is genteel visiting founded on esteem, in the absence of suitable furniture and complete dinner-service.
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist. Middlemarch, ch. 23 (1871-1872).

    Read more quotations about / on: world
[Hata Bildir]