Quotations From GEORGE ELIOT [MARY ANN (OR MARIAN) EVANS]

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  • 61.
    If we use common words on a great occasion, they are the more striking, because they are felt at once to have a particular meaning, like old banners, or everyday clothes, hung up in a sacred place.
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist. Maggie Tulliver, in The Mill on the Floss, bk. 6, ch. 2 (1860).
  • 62.
    ... pride is not a bad thing when it only urges us to hide our own hurts—not to hurt others.
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist. Middlemarch, ch. 6 (1871-1872).

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  • 63.
    In every parting there is an image of death.
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist. First published in Blackwood's Magazine (1857). Amos Barton, ch. 10, Scenes of Clerical Life (1858).

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  • 64.
    ... despair is often only the painful eagerness of unfed hope.
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist. Middlemarch, ch. 47 (1871-1872).

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  • 65.
    Our words have wings, but fly not where we would.
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist, editor. The Spanish Gypsy, bk. 3 (1868).

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  • 66.
    Best friend, my well-spring in the wilderness!
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist. The Spanish Gypsy, bk. 3 (1868). Pseudonym of Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans.

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  • 67.
    Obligation may be stretched till it is no better than a brand of slavery stamped on us when we were too young to know its meaning.
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist. Middlemarch, ch. 39 (1871-1872).
  • 68.
    ... very little achievement is required in order to pity another man's shortcomings.
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist. Middlemarch, ch. 21 (1871-1872).
  • 69.
    The happiest women, like the happiest nations, have no history.
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist, editor. The Mill on the Floss, bk. 6, ch. 3 (1860).

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  • 70.
    Jealousy is never satisfied with anything short of an omniscience that would detect the subtlest fold of the heart.
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist. The Mill on the Floss, bk. 6, ch. 10 (1860). Pseudonym of Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans.

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