Quotations From GEORGE GORDON NOEL BYRON

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  • It is very iniquitous to make me pay my debts—you have no idea of the pain it gives one.
    George Gordon Noel Byron (1788-1824), British poet. letter, Oct. 26, 1819. Byron's Letters and Journals, vol. 6, ed. Leslie A. Marchand (1973-1981).

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  • Such is Truth! Men dare not look her in the face, except by degrees: they mistake her for a Gorgon, instead of knowing her to be a Minerva.
    George Gordon Noel Byron (1788-1824), British poet. Letter, June 10, 1822, to author Isaac D'Israeli. Byron's Letters and Journals, vol. 9, ed. Leslie A. Marchand (1973-1981).

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  • I would rather ... have a nod from an American, than a snuff- box from an emperor.
    George Gordon Noel Byron (1788-1824), British poet. Letter, June 8, 1822, to poet Thomas Moore. Byron's Letters and Journals, vol. 9, ed. Leslie A. Marchand (1979).
  • Shelley is truth itself—and honour itself—notwithstanding his out-of-the-way notions about religion.
    George Gordon Noel Byron (1788-1824), British poet. Letter, June 2, 1821. Byron's Letters and Journals, vol. 8, ed. Leslie A. Marchand (1973-1981).

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  • What makes a regiment of soldiers a more noble object of view than the same mass of mob? Their arms, their dresses, their banners, and the art and artificial symmetry of their position and movements.
    George Gordon Noel Byron (1788-1824), British poet. Letter, February 7, 1821, to publisher John Murray.
  • I know that two and two make four—& should be glad to prove it too if I could—though I must say if by any sort of process I could convert 2 & 2 into five it would give me much greater pleasure.
    George Gordon Noel Byron (1788-1824), British poet. Letter, 1813, to Annabella Milbanke. Byron's Letters and Journals, vol. 3, no. 10, ed. Leslie A. Marchand (1973-1981). Ms. Milbanke later became Lady Byron.
  • I am as comfortless as a pilgrim with peas in his shoes—and as cold as Charity, Chastity or any other Virtue.
    George Gordon Noel Byron (1788-1824), British poet. letter, Nov. 16, 1814, to Annabella Milbanke—later Lady Byron. Byron's Letters and Journals, vol. 4, ed. Leslie Marchand (1975).

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  • The greenest island of my imagination.
    George Gordon Noel Byron (1788-1824), British poet. letter, Nov. 17, 1816, to poet Thomas Moore. Byron's Letters and Journals, vol. 5, ed. Leslie A. Marchand (1973-1981).

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  • I do detest everything which is not perfectly mutual.
    George Gordon Noel Byron (1788-1824), British poet. letter, Oct. 21, 1813. Byron's Letters and Journals, vol. 3, ed. Leslie Marchand (1974).
  • My turn of mind is so given to taking things in the absurd point of view, that it breaks out in spite of me every now and then.
    George Gordon Noel Byron (1788-1824), British poet. repr. In Doris Langley Moore, The Late Lord Byron, ch. 8 (1961, revised edition 1976). Quoted in Thomas Moore, Biography of Byron (1830). Remark to the poet Thomas Moore.
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