Quotations From H.G. (HERBERT GEORGE) WELLS

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  • 21.
    There comes a moment in the day when you have written your pages in the morning, attended to your correspondence in the afternoon, and have nothing further to do. Then comes that hour when you are bored; that's the time for sex.
    H.G. (Herbert George) Wells (1866-1946), British author. Quoted in Charlie Chaplin, My Autobiography, ch. 16 (1964).

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  • 22.
    There is nothing in machinery, there is nothing in embankments and railways and iron bridges and engineering devices to oblige them to be ugly. Ugliness is the measure of imperfection.
    H.G. (Herbert George) Wells (1866-1946), British author. repr. In The Works of H.G. Wells, vol. 9 (1925). A Modern Utopia, ch. 3, sct. 8 (1905).
  • 23.
    He was inordinately proud of England and he abused her incessantly.
    H.G. (Herbert George) Wells (1866-1946), British author. Mr. Britling Sees It Through, bk. 1, ch. 2, sct. 2.
  • 24.
    Biologically the species is the accumulation of the experiments of all its successful individuals since the beginning.
    H.G. (Herbert George) Wells (1866-1946), British author. repr. In The Works of H.G. Wells, vol. 9 (1925). A Modern Utopia, ch. 3, sect. 4 (1905).
  • 25.
    Cycle tracks will abound in Utopia.
    H.G. (Herbert George) Wells (1866-1946), British author. repr. In The Works of H.G. Wells, vol. 9 (1925). A Modern Utopia, ch. 2, sct. 3 (1905).
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