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Quotations From HENRY DAVID THOREAU


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  • I have been accustomed to make excursions to the ponds within ten miles of Concord, but latterly I have extended my excursions to the seashore.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Cape Cod (1855-1865), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, p. 3, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
  • Exaggerated history is poetry, and truth referred to a new standard.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Thomas Carlyle and His Works" (1847), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, p. 353, Houghton Mifflin (1906).

    Read more quotations about / on: poetry, history, truth
  • The best thing a man can do for his culture when he is rich is to endeavor to carry out those schemes which he entertained when he was poor.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Civil Disobedience," originally published as "Resistance to Civil Government" (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, p. 372, Houghton Mifflin (1906).

    Read more quotations about / on: culture
  • Here or nowhere is our heaven.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 405, Houghton Mifflin (1906).

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  • The repugnance to animal food is not the effect of experience, but is an instinct. It appeared more beautiful to live low and fare hard in many respects; and though I never did so, I went far enough to please my imagination.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 237, Houghton Mifflin (1906).

    Read more quotations about / on: animal, food, imagination, beautiful
  • If the condition of things which we were made for is not yet, what were any reality which we can substitute? We will not be shipwrecked on a vain reality.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 359, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
  • Remember that the smallest seed of faith is of more worth than the largest fruit of happiness.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Letter, January 25, 1843, to Lucy Brown, in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 6, p. 48, Houghton Mifflin (1906).

    Read more quotations about / on: happiness, remember, faith
  • The process of discovery is very simple. An unwearied and systematic application of known laws to nature causes the unknown to reveal themselves.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, pp. 387-388, Houghton Mifflin (1906).

    Read more quotations about / on: nature
  • The virtue of making two blades of grass grow where only one grew before does not begin to be superhuman.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Chesuncook" (1858) in The Maine Woods (1864), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 3, p. 171, Houghton Mifflin (1906). Thoreau refers here to so-called "model farms."
  • Ignorance and bungling with love are better than wisdom and skill without.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 301, Houghton Mifflin (1906).

    Read more quotations about / on: love
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