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Quotations From HENRY DAVID THOREAU

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  • 191.
    To be a philosopher is not merely to have subtle thoughts, nor even to found a school, but so to love wisdom as to live according to its dictates a life of simplicity, independence, magnanimity, and trust. It is to solve some of the problems of life, not only theoretically, but practically.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Economy," Walden (1854).

    Read more quotations about / on: trust, school, life, love
  • 192.
    Deep are the foundations of sincerity. Even stone walls have their foundation below the frost.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 351, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
  • 193.
    Read the best books first, or you may not have a chance to read them at all.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 98, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
  • 194.
    The stillness was intense and almost conscious, as if it were a natural Sabbath, and we fancied that the morning was the evening of a celestial day.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 45, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
  • 195.
    How sweet it would be to treat men and things, for an hour, for just what they are!
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Letter, April 3, 1850, to Harrison Blake, in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 6, p. 177, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
  • 196.
    Truly the stars were given for a consolation to man.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "A Walk to Wachusett" (1843), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 5, p. 146, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
  • 197.
    I have seen some whose consciences, owing undoubtedly to former indulgence, had grown to be as irritable as spoilt children, and at length gave them no peace. They did not know when to swallow their cud, and their lives of course yielded no milk.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 75, Houghton Mifflin (1906).

    Read more quotations about / on: peace, children
  • 198.
    For the most part we allow only outlying and transient circumstances to make our occasions. They are, in fact, the cause of our distraction.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 148, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
  • 199.
    Where shall we look for standard English but to the words of a standard man?
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 107, Houghton Mifflin (1906). By "standard" Thoreau means "representative" in Emerson's sense of the word (e.g., a man of genius).
  • 200.
    Every day our garments become more assimilated to ourselves, receiving the impress of the wearer's character, until we hesitate to lay them aside without such delay and medical appliances and some such solemnity even as our bodies.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 24, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
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