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Quotations From HENRY DAVID THOREAU


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  • It was the pine alone, chiefly the white pine, that had tempted any but the hunter to precede us on this route.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Ktaadn" (1848) in The Maine Woods (1864), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 3, p. 23, Houghton Mifflin (1906).

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  • The wonderful purity of nature at this season is a most pleasing fact.... In the bare fields and tinkling woods, see what virtue survives. In the coldest and bleakest places, the warmest charities still maintain a foothold.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "A Winter Walk" (1843), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 5, p. 167, Houghton Mifflin (1906).

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  • Of all ebriosity, who does not prefer to be intoxicated by the air he breathes?
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Higher Laws," Walden (1854).
  • I would that I were worthy to be any man's Friend.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 282, Houghton Mifflin (1906).

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  • It is remarkable that among all the preachers there are so few moral teachers. The prophets are employed in excusing the ways of men.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Life Without Principle" (1863), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, p. 468, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
  • As no one can tell what was the Roman pronunciation, each nation makes the Latin conform, for the most part, to the rules of its own language; so that with us of the vowels only A has a peculiar sound.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Letter, October 6, 1838, to Helen Thoreau, in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 6, p. 25, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
  • What can be expressed in words can be expressed in life.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Letter, March 27, 1848, to Harrison Blake, in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 6, p. 163, Houghton Mifflin (1906).

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  • His scenery is always true, and not invented.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 96, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
  • It is a momentous fact that a man may be good, or he may be bad; his life may be true, or it may be false; it may be either a shame or a glory to him. The good man builds himself up; the bad man destroys himself.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Letter, May 2, 1848, to Harrison Blake, in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 6, p. 166, Houghton Mifflin (1906).

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  • I am too easily contented with a slight and almost animal happiness. My happiness is a good deal like that of the woodchucks.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Letter, May 2, 1848, to Harrison Blake, in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 6, p. 168, Houghton Mifflin (1906).

    Read more quotations about / on: happiness, animal
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