Quotations From HENRY JAMES


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  • Experience is never limited, and it is never complete; it is an immense sensibility, a kind of huge spider-web of the finest silken threads suspended in the chamber of consciousness, and catching every air-borne particle in its tissue.
    Henry James (1843-1916), U.S. author. repr. In Partial Portraits (1888). The Art of Fiction (1884).
  • The only reason for the existence of a novel is that it does attempt to represent life.
    Henry James (1843-1916), U.S. author. repr. In Partial Portraits (1888). The Art of Fiction (1884).

    Read more quotations about / on: life
  • “Three things in human life are important: the first is to be kind; the second is to be kind; and the third is to be kind.”
  • “She feels in italics and thinks in CAPITALS.”
  • “Summer afternoon—summer afternoon; to me those have always been the two most beautiful words in the English language.”
  • “Im glad you like adverbs — I adore them; they are the only qualifications I really much respect.”
  • “Its time to start living the life youve imagined.”
  • “I dont want everyone to like me; I should think less of myself if some people did.”
  • “It has made me better loving you... it has made me wiser, and easier, and brighter. I used to want a great many things before, and to be angry that I did not have them. Theoretically, I was satisfied. I flattered myself that I had limited my wants. But I was subject to irritation; I used to have morbid sterile hateful fits of hunger, of desire. Now I really am satisfied, because I can’t think of anything better. It’s just as when one has been trying to spell out a book in the twilight, and suddenly the lamp comes in. I had been putting out my eyes over the book of life, and finding nothing to reward me for my pains; but now that I can read it properly I see that it’s a delightful story.”
  • “It has made me better loving you... it has made me wiser, and easier, and brighter. I used to want a great many things before, and to be angry that I did not have them. Theoretically, I was satisfied. I flattered myself that I had limited my wants. But I was subject to irritation; I used to have morbid sterile hateful fits of hunger, of desire. Now I really am satisfied, because I can’t think of anything better. It’s just as when one has been trying to spell out a book in the twilight, and suddenly the lamp comes in. I had been putting out my eyes over the book of life, and finding nothing to reward me for my pains; but now that I can read it properly I see that it’s a delightful story.” , The Portrait of a Lady
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