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Quotations From HERMAN MELVILLE

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  • 171.
    Cripples, above all men, should be companionable, or, at least, refrain from picking a fellow-limper to pieces.
    Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. The Confidence-Man (1857), ch. 3, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 10, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1984).
  • 172.
    The poor man wants many things; the covetous man, all.
    Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Mardi (1849), ch. 124, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 3, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1970). Babbalanja, the philosopher, reading from a book.
  • 173.
    At sea a fellow comes out. Salt water is like wine, in that respect.
    Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Letter, May 28, 1860, to Evert A. Duyckinck. Correspondence, vol. 14, The Writings of Herman Melville, ed. Lynn Horth (1993).

    Read more quotations about / on: respect, water, sea
  • 174.
    contempt is as frequently produced at first sight as love.
    Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Omoo (1846), ch. 20, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 2, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1968).

    Read more quotations about / on: love
  • 175.
    He who is ready to despair in solitary peril, plucks up a heart in the presence of another. In a plurality of comrades is much countenance and consolation.
    Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Mardi (1849), ch. 34, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 3, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1970).

    Read more quotations about / on: despair, heart
  • 176.
    Mystery is in the morning, and mystery in the night, and the beauty of mystery is everywhere; but still the plain truth remains, that mouth and purse must be filled.
    Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. The Confidence-Man (1857), ch. 37, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 10, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1984). Spoken by Mark Winsome, the transcendentalist.

    Read more quotations about / on: beauty, night, truth
  • 177.
    We are only what we are; not what we would be; nor every thing we hope for. We are but a step in a scale, that reaches further above us than below.
    Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Mardi (1849), ch. 175, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 3, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1970). Spoken by Babbalanja, the philosopher.

    Read more quotations about / on: hope
  • 178.
    Indolence is heaven's ally here,
    And energy the child of hell:
    The Good Man pouring from his pitcher clear
    But brims the poisoned well.
    Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. poet, novelist. Fragments of a Lost Gnostic Poem of the Twelfth Century (l. 5-8). . . Selected Poems of Herman Melville. Hennig Cohen, ed. (1991) Fordham University Press.

    Read more quotations about / on: heaven, child
  • 179.
    Surely no mere mortal who has at all gone down into himself will ever pretend that his slightest thought or act solely originates in his own defined identity.
    Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Pierre (1852), bk. X, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 7, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1971).

    Read more quotations about / on: identity, gone
  • 180.
    'Tis no great valor to perish sword in hand, and bravado on lip; cased all in panoply complete. For even the alligator dies in his mail, and the swordfish never surrenders. To expire, mild-eyed, in one's bed, transcends the death of Epaminondas.
    Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Mardi (1849), ch. 9, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 3, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1970).

    Read more quotations about / on: death
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