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Quotations From HERMAN MELVILLE

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  • 181.
    We die, because we live.
    Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Mardi (1849), ch. 178, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 3, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1970). Spoken by Babbalanja, the philosopher.
  • 182.
    Our institutions have a potent digestion, and may in time convert and assimilate to good all elements thrown in, however originally alien.
    Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. "Supplement." "Battle-Pieces" (1866), p. 465, Collected Poems of Herman Melville, ed. Howard P. Vincent (1947).

    Read more quotations about / on: time
  • 183.
    The scythe that advances forever and never needs whetting.
    Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. "Rip Van Winkle's Lilac." "Weeds and Wildings" (posthumous), p. 286, Collected Poems of Herman Melville, ed. Howard P. Vincent (1947). Referring to time.

    Read more quotations about / on: forever
  • 184.
    This mortal air is one wide pestilence, that kills us all at last.
    Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Mardi (1849), ch. 178, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 3, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1970). Spoken by Babbalanja, the philosopher.
  • 185.
    Benevolent desires, after passing a certain point, can not undertake their own fulfillment without incurring the risk of evils beyond those sought to be remedied.
    Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. "Supplement." "Battle-Pieces" (1866), p. 465, Collected Poems of Herman Melville, ed. Howard P. Vincent (1947).
  • 186.
    Of all insults, the temporary condescension of a master to a slave is the most outrageous and galling. That potentate who most condescends, mark him well; for that potentate, if occasion come, will prove your uttermost tyrant.
    Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. White-Jacket (1850), ch. 66, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 5, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1969).
  • 187.
    Though gilded and golden, the serpent of vice is a serpent still.
    Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Redburn (1849), ch. 46, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 4, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1969).
  • 188.
    A laugh is a mighty good thing, and rather too scarce a good thing.
    Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Moby-Dick (1851), ch. 5, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 6, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1988).
  • 189.
    Toil is man's allotment; toil of brain, or toil of hands, or a grief that's more than either, the grief and sin of idleness.
    Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Mardi (1849), ch. 63, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 3, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1970).

    Read more quotations about / on: grief
  • 190.
    I felt a melting in me. No more my splintered heart and maddened hand were turned against the wolfish world.
    Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Moby-Dick (1851), ch. 10, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 6, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1988). Concerns the effect of Queequeg on Ishmael.

    Read more quotations about / on: heart, world
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