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Quotations From HONORÉ DE BALZAC

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  • 61.
    A mother, who is really a mother, is never free.
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Renée in a letter to Louise, in Letters of Two Brides (Mémoires de Deux Jeunes Mariées), in La Presse (1841-1842), Souverain (1842), included in the Scènes de la Vie Privée in the Comédie humaine (1845, trans. by George Saintsbury, 1971).

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  • 62.
    To have one's mother-in-law in the country when one lives in Paris, and vice versa, is one of those strokes of luck that one encounters only too rarely.
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Meditation Number XII, Canel (1829). Balzac's generalizations about mothers-in-law.

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  • 63.
    When law becomes despotic, morals are relaxed, and vice versa.
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Later appeared as part of Romans et contes philosophiques (1831), and part of the Etudes philosophiques (1831). It then entered the Comédie humaine (1845, trans. by George Saintsbury, 1971). Emile, in The Wild Ass's Skin (La Peau de chagrin), which was first published by Gosselin (1831).
  • 64.
    Those who spend too fast never grow rich.
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. M. Guillaume, in At the Sign of the Cat and the Racket, vol. I of the Comédie humaine (1845, trans. by George Saintsbury, 1971), originally named Gloire et Malheur, published as La Maison du Chat-qui-Pelote (1830).
  • 65.
    Children, dear and loving children, can alone console a woman for the loss of her beauty.
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Mme. Gaston in a letter to Mme. De l'Estorade, in Letters of Two Brides (Mémoires de Deux Jeunes Mariées), in La Presse (1841-1842), Souverain (1842), included in the Scènes de la Vie Privée in the Comédie humaine (1845, trans. by George Saintsbury, 1971).

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  • 66.
    For passion, be it observed, brings insight with it; it can give a sort of intelligence to simpletons, fools, and idiots, especially during youth.
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Narrator, in A Bachelor's Establishment, originally named Les Célibataires, first part was published as Les Deux Frères in La Presse (1841); included in the Comédie humaine first under the title Un Ménage de Garìon and finally as La Rabo.

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  • 67.
    The passion of love is essentially selfish, while motherhood widens the circle of our feelings.
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Mme. Gaston in a letter to Mme. De l'Estorade, in Letters of Two Brides (Mémoires de Deux Jeunes Mariées), in La Presse (1841-1842), Souverain (1842), included in the Scènes de la Vie Privée in the Comédie humaine (1845, trans. by George Saintsbury, 1971).

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  • 68.
    Intuition, like the rays of the sun, acts only in an inflexibly straight line; it can guess right only on condition of never diverting its gaze; the freaks of chance disturb it.
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Narrator, in A Bachelor's Establishment, originally named Les Célibataires, first part was published as Les Deux Frères in La Presse (1841); included in the Comédie humaine first under the title Un Ménage de Garìon and finally as La Rabo.

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  • 69.
    Suicide , moreover, was at the time in vogue in Paris: what more suitable key to the mystery of life for a skeptical society?
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Then in vol. I, ch. VII, of the Comédie humaine (1845, trans. by George Saintsbury, 1971). Narrator, in A Daughter of Eve (Une Fille d'Eve), published with Massimilla Doni, Souverain (1839), first appeared in Le Siècle (1838-1839).

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  • 70.
    At fifteen, beauty and talent do not exist; there can only be promise of the coming woman.
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Then in vol. I, ch. V, of the Comédie humaine (1845, trans. by George Saintsbury, 1971). Narrator, in A Daughter of Eve (Une Fille d'Eve), published with Massimilla Doni, Souverain (1839), first appeared in Le Siècle (1838-1839).

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