Quotations From HORACE WALPOLE

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  • 11.
    Nothing has shown more fully the prodigious ignorance of human ideas and their littleness, than the discovery of [Sir William] Herschell, that what used to be called the Milky Way is a portion of perhaps an infinite multitude of worlds!
    Horace Walpole (1717-1797), British author. Horace Walpole's Miscellany 1786-1795, p. 58, ed. Lars E. Troide, Yale University Press (1978). Originally written in 1787.
  • 12.
    Defaced ruins of architecture and statuary, like the wrinkles of decrepitude of a once beautiful woman, only make one regret that one did not see them when they were enchanting.
    Horace Walpole (1717-1797), British author. Horace Walpole's Miscellany 1786-1795, pp. 6-7, ed. by Lars E. Troide, copyright Yale University Press (1978). Extract from a missing letter, c. July 1786, to Lady Craven.

    Read more quotations about / on: beautiful, woman
  • 13.
    I never found even in my juvenile hours that it was necessary to go a thousand miles in search of themes for moralizing.
    Horace Walpole (1717-1797), British author. Horace Walpole's Miscellany 1786-1795, p. 7, ed. Lars E. Troide, Yale University Press (1978). Extract from a missing letter, c. July 1786, to Lady Craven.
  • 14.
    The sure way of judging whether our first thoughts are judicious, is to sleep on them. If they appear of the same force the next morning as they did over night, and if good nature ratifies what good sense approves, we may be pretty sure we are in the right.
    Horace Walpole (1717-1797), British author. Horace Walpole's Miscellany 1786-1795, p. 62, ed. Lars E. Troide, Yale University Press (1978). Originally written in 1787.

    Read more quotations about / on: sleep, night, nature
  • 15.
    They who feel cannot keep their minds in the equilibrium of a pair of scales: fear and hope have no equiponderant weights.
    Horace Walpole (1717-1797), British author. Horace Walpole's Miscellany 1786-1795, p. 33, ed. Lars E. Troide, Yale University Press (1978). Originally written in 1786.

    Read more quotations about / on: hope, fear
  • 16.
    By deafness one gains in one respect more than one loses; one misses more nonsense than sense.
    Horace Walpole (1717-1797), British author. Horace Walpole's Miscellany 1786-1795, p. 68, ed. Lars E. Troide, Yale University Press (1978). Originally written in 1788.

    Read more quotations about / on: respect
  • 17.
    [The] taste [of the French] is too timid to be true taste—or is but half taste.
    Horace Walpole (1717-1797), British author. Horace Walpole's Miscellany 1786-1795, p. 57, ed. Lars E. Troide, Yale University Press (1978). Originally written in 1787.
  • 18.
    Cunning is neither the consequence of sense, nor does it give sense. A proof that it is not sense, is that cunning people never imagine that others can see through them. It is the consequence of weakness.
    Horace Walpole (1717-1797), British author. Horace Walpole's Miscellany 1786-1795, p. 23, ed. by Lars E. Troide, copyright Yale University Press (1978). Originally written in 1786.

    Read more quotations about / on: imagine, people
  • 19.
    We often repent of our first thoughts, and scarce ever of our second.
    Horace Walpole (1717-1797), British author. Horace Walpole's Miscellany 1786-1795, p. 62, ed. Lars E. Troide, Yale University Press (1978). Originally written in 1787.
  • 20.
    Our [British] summers are often, though beautiful for verdure, so cold, that they are rather cold winters.
    Horace Walpole (1717-1797), British author. Horace Walpole's Miscellany 1786-1795, p. 52, ed. Lars E. Troide, Yale University Press (1978). Originally written in 1787.

    Read more quotations about / on: cold, beautiful
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