Quotations From IMMANUEL KANT


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  • Enlightenment is the liberation of man from his self-caused state of minority... Supere aude! Dare to use your own understanding! is thus the motto of the Enlightenment.
    Immanuel Kant (1724-1804), German philosopher. What Is Enlightenment? (1784).
  • Intuition and concepts constitute ... the elements of all our knowledge, so that neither concepts without an intuition in some way corresponding to them, nor intuition without concepts, can yield knowledge.
    Immanuel Kant (1724-1804), German philosopher. "Transcendental Doctrine of Elements: Transcendental Logic," sct. 1, Critique of Pure Reason (1781).
  • All the interests of my reason, speculative as well as practical, combine in the three following questions:
    1. What can I know?
    2. What ought I to do?
    3. What may I hope?
    Immanuel Kant (1724-1804), German philosopher. "Transcendental Doctrine of Method," ch. 2, sct. 2, Critique of Pure Reason (1781).

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  • I had therefore to remove knowledge, in order to make room for belief.
    Immanuel Kant (1724-1804), German philosopher. Critique of Pure Reason, preface, to the second edition, p. 22, Kant Selections, ed. T.M. Greene, Scribners, New York (1920). Relation of faith and knowledge.
  • But although all our knowledge begins with experience, it does not follow that it arises from experience.
    Immanuel Kant (1724-1804), German philosopher. Critique of Pure Reason, Introduction, part 1, p. 26, Kant Selections, ed. T.M. Greene, Scribners, New York (1920). Basis for Kant's theory.
  • Thoughts without content are empty, intuitions without concepts are blind.
    Immanuel Kant (1724-1804), German philosopher. Critique of Pure Reason, "Transcendental Logic," Introduction, part 1, p. 57, Kant Selections, ed. T.M. Greene, Scribners, New York (1920). Basis for Kant's theory.

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  • The sceptics, a kind of nomads, despising all settled culture of the land, broke up from time to time all civil society. Fortunately their number was small, and they could not prevent the old settlers from returning to cultivate the ground afresh, though without any fixed plan or agreement.
    Immanuel Kant (1724-1804), German philosopher. Critique of Pure Reason, Introduction, p. 2, Kant Selections, ed. T.M. Greene, Scribners, New York (1920). Kant's evaluation of skepticism.

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  • Two things fill the mind with ever new and increasing wonder and awe, the more often and the more seriously reflection concentrates upon them: the starry heaven above me and the moral law within me.
    Immanuel Kant (1724-1804), German philosopher. Critique of Pure Reason, conclusion (1788).

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  • The arts of speech are rhetoric and poetry. Rhetoric is the art of transacting a serious business of the understanding as if it were a free play of the imagination; poetry that of conducting a free play of the imagination as if it were a serious business of the understanding.
    Immanuel Kant (1724-1804), German philosopher. Critique of Aesthetic Judgment (date)?

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  • Out of timber so crooked as that from which man is made nothing entirely straight can be carved.
    Immanuel Kant (1724-1804), German philosopher. Idee zu einer Allgemeinen Gesichte in Weltburgerlicher Absicht, proposition 6 (1784). Quoted by Isaiah Berlin as epigraph to The Crooked Timber of Humanity (1990).
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