Quotations From J. ELLEN FOSTER

 

  • Party action should follow, not precede the creation of a dominant popular sentiment.
    J. Ellen Foster (1840-1910), U.S. attorney, temperance activist, and suffragist. What America Owes to Women, ch. 33 (1893).
  • Sentiment is the mightiest force in civilization; not sentimentality, but sentiment. Women will bring this into politics. Home, sweet home, is as powerful on the hustings as at the fireside.
    J. Ellen Foster (1840-1910), U.S. attorney, temperance activist, and suffragist. What America Owes to Women, ch. 33 (1893).

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  • The cultivation of one set of faculties tends to the disuse of others. The loss of one faculty sharpens others; the blind are sensitive in touch. Has not the extreme cultivation of the commercial faculty permitted others as essential to national life, to be blighted by disease?
    J. Ellen Foster (1840-1910), U.S. attorney, temperance activist, and suffragist. What America Owes to Women, ch. 33 (1893). Reflecting on America's national prosperity.

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  • It is too late in the century for women who have received the benefits of co-education in schools and colleges, and who bear their full share in the world's work, not to care who make the laws, who expound and who administer them.
    J. Ellen Foster (1840-1910), U.S. attorney, temperance activist, and suffragist. What America Owes to Women, ch. 33 (1893). On the irony of co-education and female employment co-existing with the denial of woman suffrage.

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  • The country needs the political work of women to-day as much as it has ever needed woman in any other work at any other time.
    J. Ellen Foster (1840-1910), U.S. attorney, temperance activist, and suffragist. What America Owes to Women, ch. 33 (1893).

    Read more quotations about / on: work, woman, women, time
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