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Quotations From JAMES MADISON

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  • 1.
    A popular Government, without popular information, or the means of acquiring it, is but a Prologue to a Farce or a Tragedy.
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. Madison to W.T. Barry, August 4, 1822. The Mind of the Founder: Sources of the Political Thought of James Madison, p. 437, ed. Marvin Meyers, Indianapolis (1973).
  • 2.
    Whenever a youth is ascertained to possess talents meriting an education which his parents cannot afford, he should be carried forward at the public expense.
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. Madison to W.T. Barry, August 4, 1822. The Mind of the Founder: Sources of the Political Thought of James Madison, p. 439, ed. Marvin Meyers, Indianapolis (1973).

    Read more quotations about / on: education
  • 3.
    What spectacle can be more edifying or more seasonable, than that of Liberty and Learning, each leaning on the other for their mutual and surest support?
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. Madison to W.T. Barry, August 4, 1822. The Mind of the Founder: Sources of the Political Thought of James Madison, p. 440, ed. Marvin Meyers, Indianapolis (1973).
  • 4.
    It is certain that every class is interested in [educational] establishments which give to the human mind its highest improvements, and to every Country its truest and most durable celebrity.
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. Madison to W.T. Barry, August 4, 1822. The Mind of the Founder: Sources of the Political Thought of James Madison, p. 438, ed. Marvin Meyers, Indianapolis (1973).
  • 5.
    The internal effects of a mutable policy ... poisons the blessings of liberty itself.
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. The Federalist Papers, Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, John Jay, p. 381, ed. Clinton Rossiter, New York (1961). The Federalist, No. 57 (February 19, 1788).
  • 6.
    The essence of government is power, and power, lodged as it must be in human hands, will ever be liable to abuse.
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. Speech at the Virginia Convention, 1829. The Mind of the Founder: Sources of the Political Thought of James Madison, p. 512, ed. Marvin Meyers, Indianapolis (1973).

    Read more quotations about / on: power
  • 7.
    In republics, the great danger is, that the majority may not sufficiently respect the rights of the minority.
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. Speech at the Virginia Convention, 1829. The Mind of the Founder: Sources of the Political Thought of James Madison, p. 512, ed. Marvin Meyers, Indianapolis (1973).

    Read more quotations about / on: respect
  • 8.
    Learned institutions ought to be favorite objects with every free people. They throw light over the public mind which is the best security against crafty and dangerous encroachments on the public liberty.
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. Madison to W.T. Barry, August 4, 1822. The Mind of the Founder: Sources of the Political Thought of James Madison, p. 438, ed. Marvin Meyers, Indianapolis (1973).

    Read more quotations about / on: light, people
  • 9.
    Any reading not of a vicious species must be a good substitute for the amusements too apt to fill up the leisure of the labouring classes.
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. Madison to W.T. Barry, August 4, 1822. The Mind of the Founder: Sources of the Political Thought of James Madison, p. 444, ed. Marvin Meyers, Indianapolis (1973).
  • 10.
    The rights of persons, and the rights of property, are the objects, for the protection of which Government was instituted.
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. Speech at the Virginia Convention, 1829. The Mind of the Founder: Sources of the Political Thought of James Madison, p. 512, ed. Marvin Meyers, Indianapolis (1973).
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