Quotations From JAMES MADISON

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  • 51.
    All that seems indispensible in stating the account between the dead and the living, is to see that the debts against the latter do not exceed the advances made by the former.
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. Madison to Thomas Jefferson, February 4, 1790. W.T. Hutchinson et al., The Papers of James Madison, vol. 13, p. 23, Chicago and Charlottesville, Virginia (1962-1991).
  • 52.
    The people shall not be restrained from peacefully assembling and consulting for their common good, nor from applying to the legislature by petitions, or remonstrances for redress of their grievances.
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. First draft of what became the First Amendment, June 8, 1789. W.T. Hutchinson et al., The Papers of James Madison, vol. 12, p. 201, Chicago and Charlottesville, Virginia (1962-1991).

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  • 53.
    [Religious liberty was] in its nature an inalienable right ... because the opinions of men, depending only upon the evidence contemplated by their minds, cannot follow the dictates of other men.
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. "Memorial and Remonstrance against Religious Assessment" (1785). W.T. Hutchinson et al., The Papers of James Madison, vol. 8, p. 299, Chicago and Charlottesville, Virginia (1962-1991).

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  • 54.
    The diversity in the faculties of men, from which the rights of property originate, is not less an insuperable obstacle to a uniformity of interests. The protection of these faculties is the first object of government.
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. Democratic-Republican politician, president. Federalist Papers, Nov. 1787, no. 10, The Federalist, ed. Benjamin F. Wright (1961).
  • 55.
    The powers of the federal government ... result from the compact to which the states are parties, [and are] limited by the plain sense and intention of the instrument constituting that compact.
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. Virginia Resolves of 1798. W.T. Hutchinson et al., The Papers of James Madison, vol. 17, p. 189, Chicago and Charlottesville, Virginia (1962-1991).
  • 56.
    [Let] the Union of the States be cherished and perpetuated. Let the open enemy to it be regarded as a Pandora with her box opened; and the disguised one, as the Serpent creeping with his deadly wiles into paradise.
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. "Advice to My Country" (1834). Madison Papers, Library of Congress.
  • 57.
    [T]he temple through which alone lies the road to that of Liberty.
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. Madison to Jefferson, February 24, 1826. Madison Papers, Library of Congress. Speaking of universities.

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  • 58.
    A certain degree of miserey [sic] seems inseparable from a high degree of populousness.
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. Madison to Jefferson, June 19, 1786. W.T. Hutchinson et al., The Papers of James Madison, vol. 9, p. 76, Chicago and Charlottesville, Virginia (1962-1991).
  • 59.
    A universal and perpetual peace, it is to be feared, is in the catalogue of events which will never exist but in the imaginations of visionary philosophers, or in the breasts of benevolent enthusiasts.
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. "Universal Peace" (January 31, 1792). W.T. Hutchinson et al., The Papers of James Madison, vol. 14, p. 207, Chicago and Charlottesville, Virginia (1962-1991).

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  • 60.
    I cannot think of punishing him ... merely for coveting that liberty for which we have paid the price of so much blood, and have proclaimed so often to be the right, and worthy pursuit of every human being.
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. Madison to his father, September 8, 1783. W.T. Hutchinson et al., The Papers of James Madison, vol. 7, p. 304, Chicago and Charlottesville, Virginia (1962-1991).
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