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Quotations From JANE AUSTEN

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  • One half of the world cannot understand the pleasures of the other.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Emma, in Emma, ch. 9 (1816).

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  • There are people, the more you do for them, the less they do for themselves.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Emma's thought, in Emma, ch. 11 (1816).

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  • The public ... is rather apt to be unreasonably discontented when a woman does marry again, than when she does not.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Persuasion, ch. 1 (1818).

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  • General benevolence, but not general friendship, made a man what he ought to be.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Emma's thought, in Emma, ch. 37 (1816).
  • To be claimed as good, though in an improper style, is at least better than being rejected as no good at all.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Persuasion, ch. 5 (1818).
  • To sit in the shade on a fine day, and look upon verdure is the most perfect refreshment.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Fanny, in Mansfield Park, ch. 9 (1814).

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  • Husbands and wives generally understand when opposition will be vain.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Persuasion, ch. 7 (1818).
  • There is no charm equal to tenderness of heart.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Emma in Emma, ch. 31 (1816).

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  • Goldsmith tells us, that when lovely woman stoops to folly, she has nothing to do but to die; and when she stoops to be disagreeable, it is equally to be recommended as a clearer of ill-fame.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Emma, ch. 45 (1816).

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  • A woman, especially, if she have the misfortune of knowing anything, should conceal it as well as she can.
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Northanger Abbey, ch. 14 (1818).

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