Learn More

Quotations From JANE WELSH CARLYLE

» More about Jane Welsh Carlyle on Poemhunter

 

  • If they had said that the sun or the moon had gone out of the heavens, it could not have struck me with the idea of a more awful and dreary blank in creation than the words: "Byron is dead!"
    Jane Welsh Carlyle (1801-1866), Scottish poet, wife of Thomas Carlyle. Letter, May 20, 1824, to her future husband Thomas Carlyle. The Love Letters of Thomas Carlyle and Jane Welsh (1908).

    Read more quotations about / on: moon, gone, sun
  • Never does one feel oneself so utterly helpless as in trying to speak comfort for great bereavement. I will not try it. Time is the only comforter for the loss of a mother.
    Jane Welsh Carlyle (1801-1866), Scottish poet. letter, Dec. 27, 1853, to her husband, Thomas Carlyle. Letters and Memorials (1883).

    Read more quotations about / on: loss, mother, time
  • When one has been threatened with a great injustice, one accepts a smaller as a favour.
    Jane Welsh Carlyle (1801-1866), Scottish poet. Letters and Memorials, entry for Nov. 21, 1855 (1883).
  • My dear, if Mr. Carlyle's digestion had been stronger, there is no saying what he might have been!
    Jane Welsh Carlyle (1801-1866), Scottish poet, wife of Thomas Carlyle. Letter, May [?] 1866. Quoted in Autobiography and Letters of Mrs. Margaret Oliphant (1899). In answer to a remark by Margaret Oliphant that "Mr. Carlyle seemed the only virtuous philosopher we had."
[Hata Bildir]