Treasure Island

Quotations From JOHN BERGER

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  • 1.
    A peasant becomes fond of his pig and is glad to salt away its pork. What is significant, and is so difficult for the urban stranger to understand, is that the two statements are connected by an and and not by a but.
    John Berger (b. 1926), British author, critic. "Why Look at Animals?" About Looking (1980).
  • 2.
    Nothing fortuitous happens in a child's world. There are no accidents. Everything is connected with everything else and everything can be explained by everything else.... For a young child everything that happens is a necessity.
    John Berger (b. 1926), British author, critic. A Fortunate Man, p. 122 (1967, repr. 1976).

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  • 3.
    Is boredom anything less than the sense of one's faculties slowly dying?
    John Berger (b. 1926), British author, critic. repr. (1976). A Fortunate Man, p. 133 (1967.

    Read more quotations about / on: dying
  • 4.
    What is saved in the cinema when it achieves art is a spontaneous continuity with all mankind. It is not an art of the princes or the bourgeoisie. It is popular and vagrant. In the sky of the cinema people learn what they might have been and discover what belongs to them apart from their single lives.
    John Berger (b. 1926), British author, critic. repr. In Keeping a Rendezvous (1992). "Ev'ry Time We Say Goodbye," first published in Expressen (Stockholm, Nov. 3, 1990).

    Read more quotations about / on: sky, people
  • 5.
    Compare ... the cinema with theatre. Both are dramatic arts. Theatre brings actors before a public and every night during the season they re-enact the same drama. Deep in the nature of theatre is a sense of ritual. The cinema, by contrast, transports its audience individually, singly, out of the theatre towards the unknown.
    John Berger (b. 1926), British author, critic. repr. In Keeping a Rendezvous (1992). "Ev'ry Time We Say Goodbye," Expressen (Stockholm, November 3, 1990).

    Read more quotations about / on: night, nature
  • 6.
    The past grows gradually around one, like a placenta for dying.
    John Berger (b. 1926), British author, critic. And Our Faces, My Heart, Brief As Photos, pt. 2 (1984).

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  • 7.
    The opposite of love is not to hate but to separate. If love and hate have something in common it is because, in both cases, their energy is that of bringing and holding together—the lover with the loved, the one who hates with the hated. Both passions are tested by separation.
    John Berger (b. 1926), British art critic, painter, novelist. And Our Faces, My Heart, Brief as Photos, ch. 2, Pantheon (1984).

    Read more quotations about / on: hate, love, together
  • 8.
    One can say of language that it is potentially the only human home, the only dwelling place that cannot be hostile to man.
    John Berger (b. 1926), British author, critic. And Our Faces, My Heart, Brief as Photos, pt. 2 (1984).

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  • 9.
    The zoo cannot but disappoint. The public purpose of zoos is to offer visitors the opportunity of looking at animals. Yet nowhere in a zoo can a stranger encounter the look of an animal. At the most, the animal's gaze flickers and passes on. They look sideways. They look blindly beyond.
    John Berger (b. 1926), British author, critic. "Why Look at Animals?" About Looking (1980).

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  • 10.
    To live and die amongst foreigners may seem less absurd than to live persecuted or tortured by one's fellow countrymen.... But to emigrate is always to dismantle the centre of the world, and so to move into a lost, disoriented one of fragments.
    John Berger (b. 1926), British author, critic. And Our Faces, My Heart, Brief As Photos, pt. 2 (1984).

    Read more quotations about / on: lost, world
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