Quotations From JOHN DEWEY

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  • 1.
    Experiences in order to be educative must lead out into an expanding world of subject matter, a subject matter of facts or information and of ideas. This condition is satisfied only as the educator views teaching and learning as a continuous process of reconstruction of experience.
    John Dewey (1859-1952), U.S. philosopher and educator. Experience and Education, ch. 7 (1938).

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  • 2.
    It is commonplace that a problem stated is well on its way to solution, for statement of the nature of a problem signifies that the underlying quality is being transformed into determinate distinctions of terms and relations or has become an object of articulate thought.
    John Dewey (1859-1952), U.S. philosopher. Originally published in The Symposium (1930). "Qualitative Thought," repr. In On Experience, Nature and Freedom, ed. Richard J. Bernstein (1960).

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  • 3.
    Language fails not because thought fails, but because no verbal symbols can do justice to the fullness and richness of thought. If we are to continue talking about "data" in any other sense than as reflective distinctions, the original datum is always such a qualitative whole.
    John Dewey (1859-1952), U.S. philosopher. Originally published in The Symposium (1930). "Qualitative Thought," repr. In On Experience, Nature and Freedom, ed. Richard J. Bernstein (1960).

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  • 4.
    The only thing that is unqualifiedly given is the total pervasive quality; and the objection to calling it "given" is that the word suggests something to which it is given, mind or thought or consciousness or whatever, as well possibly as something that gives.
    John Dewey (1859-1952), U.S. philosopher. Originally published in The Symposium (1930). "Qualitative Thought," repr. In On Experience, Nature and Freedom, ed. Richard J. Bernstein (1960).
  • 5.
    When "reality" is sought for at large, it is without intellectual import; at most the term carries the connotation of an agreeable emotional state.
    John Dewey (1859-1952), U.S. philosopher. Originally published in California Publications in Philosophy (1931). "Context and Thought," repr. In On Experience, Nature and Freedom, ed. Richard J. Bernstein (1960).
  • 6.
    I know that there are many persons to whom it seems derogatory to link a body of philosophic ideas to the social life and culture of their epoch. They seem to accept a dogma of immaculate conception of philosophical systems.
    John Dewey (1859-1952), U.S. philosopher. repr. From California Publications in Philosophy (1931). "Context and Thought," repr. In On Experience, Nature and Freedom, ed. Richard J. Bernstein (1960).

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  • 7.
    The belief that all genuine education comes about through experience does not mean that all experiences are genuinely or equally educative.
    John Dewey (1859-1952), U.S. philosopher and educator. Experience and Education, ch. 2 (1938).

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  • 8.
    Man lives in a world of surmise, of mystery, of uncertainties.
    John Dewey (1859-1952), U.S. philosopher. Originally published 1934. Art as Experience, ch. 2, Capricorn Books (1958).

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  • 9.
    Nature is the mother and the habitat of man, even if sometimes a stepmother and an unfriendly home.
    John Dewey (1859-1952), U.S. philosopher. Originally published 1934. Art as Experience, ch. 2, Capricorn Books (1958).

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  • 10.
    I should venture to assert that the most pervasive fallacy of philosophic thinking goes back to neglect of context.
    John Dewey (1859-1952), U.S. philosopher. Originally published in California Publications in Philosophy (1931). "Context and Thought," repr. In On Experience, Nature and Freedom, ed. Richard J. Bernstein (1960).
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