Quotations From JOHN MAYNARD KEYNES


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  • A study of the history of opinion is a necessary preliminary to the emancipation of the mind.
    John Maynard Keynes (1883-1946), British economist. The End of Laissez-Faire, ch. 1 (1926).

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  • Most men love money and security more, and creation and construction less, as they get older.
    John Maynard Keynes (1883-1946), British economist. "The Future," Essays in Persuasion (1931).

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  • The disruptive powers of excessive national fecundity may have played a greater part in bursting the bonds of convention than either the power of ideas or the errors of autocracy.
    John Maynard Keynes (1883-1946), British economist. repr. In Collected Works, vol. 2 (1971). The Economic Consequences of Peace (1919).

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  • Words ought to be a little wild for they are the assault of thoughts on the unthinking.
    John Maynard Keynes (1883-1946), British economist. New Statesman and Nation (London, July 15, 1933).
  • The social object of skilled investment should be to defeat the dark forces of time and ignorance which envelope our future.
    John Maynard Keynes (1883-1946), British economist. General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money, bk. 4, ch. 12, sct. 5 (1936).

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  • Nothing mattered except states of mind, chiefly our own.
    John Maynard Keynes (1883-1946), British economist. Essays in Biography, ch. 39 (1933). Of the "Apostles" group at Cambridge University.
  • Long run is a misleading guide to current affairs. In the long run we are all dead.
    John Maynard Keynes (1883-1946), British economist. A Tract on Monetary Reform, ch. 3 (1923).
  • It is ideas, not vested interests, which are dangerous for good or evil.
    John Maynard Keynes (1883-1946), British economist. "Concluding Notes," ch. 24, The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money (1936).

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  • I do not know which makes a man more conservative—to know nothing but the present, or nothing but the past.
    John Maynard Keynes (1883-1946), British economist. The End of Laissez-Faire, ch. 1 (1926).
  • If economists could manage to get themselves thought of as humble, competent people on a level with dentists, that would be splendid.
    John Maynard Keynes (1883-1946), British economist. "The Future," ch. 5, Essays in Persuasion (1931).

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