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Quotations From JOHN RUSKIN

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  • 51.
    To see clearly is poetry, prophecy and religion—all in one.
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. Modern Painters III, pt. 4, ch. 16 (1856).

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  • 52.
    Nearly all our powerful men in this age of the world are unbelievers; the best of them in doubt and misery; the worst of them in reckless defiance; the plurality in plodding hesitation, doing, as well as they can, what practical work lies ready to their hands.
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. Modern Painters III, pt. 4, ch. 16 (1856).

    Read more quotations about / on: work, world
  • 53.
    Men were not intended to work with the accuracy of tools, to be precise and perfect in all their actions.
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. The Stones of Venice, vol. II, ch. 6 (1853).

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  • 54.
    The art which we may call generally art of the wayside, as opposed to that which is the business of men's lives, is, in the best sense of the word, Grotesque.
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. The Stones of Venice, vol. III, ch. 3 (1853).
  • 55.
    Remember that the most beautiful things in the world are the most useless; peacocks and lilies for instance.
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. The Stones of Venice, vol. I, ch. 2 (1851).

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  • 56.
    Borrowers are nearly always ill-spenders, and it is with lent money that all evil is mainly done and all unjust war protracted.
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. The Crown of Wild Olive, lecture 1 (1866).

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  • 57.
    An architect should live as little in cities as a painter. Send him to our hills, and let him study there what nature understands by a buttress, and what by a dome.
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. "The Lamp of Power," sect. 24, The Seven Lamps of Architecture (1849).

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  • 58.
    All that we call ideal in Greek or any other art, because to us it is false and visionary, was, to the makers of it, true and existent.
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. Modern Painters III, pt. 4, ch. 7 (1856).
  • 59.
    I believe the right question to ask, respecting all ornament, is simply this: Was it done with enjoyment—was the carver happy while he was about it?
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. The Seven Lamps of Architecture, ch. 5 (1849).

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  • 60.
    It seems a fantastic paradox, but it is nevertheless a most important truth, that no architecture can be truly noble which is not imperfect.
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. The Stones of Venice, vol. II, ch. 6 (1853).

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