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Quotations From JOSEPH ADDISON

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  • 1.
    Admiration is a very short-lived passion that immediately decays upon growing familiar with its object, unless it be still fed with fresh discoveries, and kept alive by a new perpetual succession of miracles rising up to its view.
    Joseph Addison (1672-1719), British essayist. Spectator, no. 256 (London, December 24, 1711).

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  • 2.
    Young men soon give, and soon forget, affronts;
    Old age is slow in both.
    Joseph Addison (1672-1719), British essayist. Syphax, in Cato, act 2, sc. 5 (1713), Works of Addison, ed. R. Hurd (1883).
  • 3.
    There is not a more unhappy being than a superannuated idol.
    Joseph Addison (1672-1719), British essayist. Spectator (London, May 24, 1711), no. 73, The Spectator, ed. D.F. Bond (1965).
  • 4.
    Husband a lie, and trump it up in some extraordinary emergency.
    Joseph Addison (1672-1719), British essayist. Spectator (London, Oct. 11, 1712), no. 507, The Spectator, ed. D.F. Bond (1965).

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  • 5.
    If we may believe our logicians, man is distinguished from all other creatures by the faculty of laughter. He has a heart capable of mirth, and naturally disposed to it.
    Joseph Addison (1672-1719), British essayist. Spectator (London, Sept. 26, 1712), no. 494, The Spectator, ed. D.F. Bond (1965).

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  • 6.
    Our disputants put me in mind of the scuttlefish that, when he is unable to extricate himself, blackens the water about him till he becomes invisible.
    Joseph Addison (1672-1719), British essayist. Spectator (London, Sept. 5, 1712), no. 476, The Spectator, ed. D.F. Bond (1965).

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  • 7.
    Mirth is like a flash of lightning, that breaks through a gloom of clouds, and glitters for a moment; cheerfulness keeps up a kind of daylight in the mind, and fills it with a steady and perpetual serenity.
    Joseph Addison (1672-1719), British essayist. Spectator (London, May 17, 1712), no. 381, The Spectator, ed. D.F. Bond (1965).
  • 8.
    What sculpture is to a block of marble, education is to an human soul.
    Joseph Addison (1672-1719), British essayist. Spectator (London, Nov. 6, 1711), no. 215, The Spectator, ed. D.F. Bond (1965).

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  • 9.
    Rides in the whirlwind and directs the storm.
    Joseph Addison (1672-1719), British essayist. repr. In Works of Addison, ed. R. Hurd (1883). The Campaign, l. 292 (1705).
  • 10.
    No oppression is so heavy or lasting as that which is inflicted by the perversion and exorbitance of legal authority.
    Joseph Addison (1672-1719), British essayist. "The Cruelty of Parental Tyranny," Interesting Anecdotes, Memoirs, Allegories, Essays, and Poetical Fragments (1794).
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