Treasure Island

Quotations From JOSIAH ROYCE

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  • 1.
    I teach at Harvard that the world and the heavens, and the stars are all real, but not so damned real, you see.
    Josiah Royce (1855-1916), U.S. philosopher. Letter to William James, May 21, 1888, reporting a conversation with a sea captain. The Letters of Josiah Royce, p. 217, ed. John Clendenning (1970).

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  • 2.
    Man you can define; but the true essence of any man, say, for instance, of Abraham Lincoln, remains the endlessly elusive and mysterious object of the biographer's interest, of the historian's comments, of popular legend, and of patriotic devotion.
    Josiah Royce (1855-1916), U.S. philosopher. Originally published 1900. The Conception of Immortality, repr. In The Religious Philosophy of Josiah Royce (1952).
  • 3.
    Listen to any musical phrase or rhythm, and grasp it as a whole, and you thereupon have present in you the image, so to speak, of the divine knowledge of the temporal order.
    Josiah Royce (1855-1916), U.S. philosopher. Originally published 1901. The World and the Individual, vol. II, lect. III, repr. In The Religious Philosophy of Josiah Royce, p. 13 (1952).
  • 4.
    By an individual being, whatever one's metaphysical doctrine, one means an unique being, that is, a being which is alone of its own type, or is such that no other of its class exists.
    Josiah Royce (1855-1916), U.S. philosopher. The World and the Individual, vol. I, lect. X, repr. In The Religious Philosophy of Josiah Royce (1952).

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  • 5.
    No consensus of men can make an error erroneous. We can only find or commit an error, not create it. When we commit an error, we say what was an error already.
    Josiah Royce (1855-1916), U.S. philosopher. Originally published 1885. The Religious Aspect of Philosophy, repr. In The Religious Philosophy of Josiah Royce (1952).

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  • 6.
    The unique eludes us; yet we remain faithful to the ideal of it; and in spite of sense and of our merely abstract thinking, it becomes for us the most real thing in the actual world, although for us it is the elusive goal of an infinite quest.
    Josiah Royce (1855-1916), U.S. philosopher. Originally published 1900. The Conception of Immortality, repr. In The Religious Philosophy of Josiah Royce (1952).

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  • 7.
    If usually the "present age" is no very long time, still, at our pleasure, or in the service of some such unity of meaning as the history of civilization, or the study of geology, may suggest, we may conceive the present as extending over many centuries, or over a hundred thousand years.
    Josiah Royce (1855-1916), U.S. philosopher. Originally published 1901. The World and the Individual, vol. II, lect. III, repr. In The Religious Philosophy of Josiah Royce (1952).

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  • 8.
    Only the more uncompromising of the mystics still seek for knowledge in a silent land of absolute intuition, where the intellect finally lays down its conceptual tools, and rests from its pragmatic labors, while its works do not follow it, but are simply forgotten, and are as if they never had been.
    Josiah Royce (1855-1916), U.S. philosopher. The Problem of Christianity, vol. II, lecture XI, Macmillan (1914).
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