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Quotations From LADY MONTAGU, MARY WORTLEY

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  • 1.
    Let this great maxim be my virtue's guide—In part she is to blame that has been tried: He comes too near that comes to be denied.
    Mary Wortley, Lady Montagu (1689-1762), British society figure, letter writer. repr. In Letters and Works of Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, ed. Lord Wharncliffe (1837, rev. 1893). "The Lady's Resolve," The Plain Dealer (London, April 27, 1724).
  • 2.
    We are no more free agents than the queen of clubs when she victoriously takes prisoner the knave of hearts.
    Mary Wortley, Lady Montagu (1689-1762), British society figure, letter writer. letter, Jan. 13, 1759. Selected Letters, ed. Robert Halsband (1970).
  • 3.
    It is the common error of builders and parents to follow some plan they think beautiful (and perhaps is so) without considering that nothing is beautiful that is misplaced.
    Mary Wortley, Lady Montagu (1689-1762), British society figure, letter writer. letter, Jan. 28, 1753, to her daughter Lady Bute. Selected Letters, ed. Robert Halsband (1970).

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  • 4.
    A man that is ashamed of passions that are natural and reasonable is generally proud of those that are shameful and silly.
    Mary Wortley, Lady Montagu (1689-1762), British society figure, letter writer. letter, c. Nov. 24, 1714, to her husband. Selected Letters, ed. Robert Halsband (1970).
  • 5.
    A face is too slight a foundation for happiness.
    Mary Wortley, Lady Montagu (1689-1762), British society figure, letter writer. Letter, April 25, 1710, to her future husband. Selected Letters, ed. Robert Halsband (1970).

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  • 6.
    No entertainment is so cheap as reading, nor any pleasure so lasting. She will not want new fashions nor regret the loss of expensive diversions or variety of company if she can be amused with an author in her closet.
    Mary Wortley, Lady Montagu (1689-1762), British society figure, letter writer. Letter, June 22, 1752, to her daughter Lady Bute. Selected Letters, ed. Robert Halsband (1970). Advising her on bringing up Lady Bute's own daughter.

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  • 7.
    Solitude begets whimsies.
    Mary Wortley, Lady Montagu (1689-1762), British society figure, letter writer. Letter, July 19, 1759. Selected Letters, ed. Robert Halsband (1970).

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  • 8.
    The ultimate end of your education was to make you a good wife.
    Mary Wortley, Lady Montagu (1689-1762), British society figure, letter writer. letter, Jan. 28, 1753, to her daughter Lady Bute. Selected Letters, ed. Robert Halsband (1970). Lady Montagu advised Lady Bute on bringing up her own daughter "to make her happy in a virgin state."

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  • 9.
    I don't say 'tis impossible for an impudent man not to rise in the world, but a moderate merit with a large share of impudence is more probable to be advanced than the greatest qualifications without it.
    Mary Wortley, Lady Montagu (1689-1762), British society figure, letter writer. Letter, c. September 24, 1714, to her husband. Selected Letters, ed. Robert Halsband (1970).

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  • 10.
    Time has the same effect on the mind as on the face; the predominant passion and the strongest feature become more conspicuous from the others' retiring.
    Mary Wortley, Lady Montagu (1689-1762), British society figure, letter writer. Selected Letters, ed. Robert Halsband (1970). letter, Sept. 5, 1758, to her daughter, Lady Bute.

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