Quotations From LAWRENCE DURRELL


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  • I'm trying to die correctly, but it's very difficult, you know.
    Lawrence Durrell (1912-1990), British author. Sunday Times (London, Nov. 20, 1988).
  • It's only with great vulgarity that you can achieve real refinement, only out of bawdry that you can get tenderness.
    Lawrence Durrell (1912-1990), British author. Interview in Writers at Work, Second Series, ed. George Plimpton (1963).
  • Guilt always hurries towards its complement, punishment; only there does its satisfaction lie.
    Lawrence Durrell (1912-1990), British author. Justine, pt. 3 (1957).

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  • A woman's best love letters are always written to the man she is betraying.
    Lawrence Durrell (1912-1990), British author. Justine, in Clea, pt. 1, ch. 4 (1960).

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  • Perhaps our only sickness is to desire a truth which we cannot bear rather than to rest content with the fictions we manufacture out of each other.
    Lawrence Durrell (1912-1990), British author. Justine, in Clea, ch. 1, sct. 3 (1960).

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  • No one can go on being a rebel too long without turning into an autocrat.
    Lawrence Durrell (1912-1990), British author. Pursewarden, in Balthazar, pt. 2, ch. 6 (1958). Writing to Lawrence.
  • Brazil is bigger than Europe, wilder than Africa, and weirder than Baffin Land.
    Lawrence Durrell (1912-1990), British author. Letter, December 1948, to Henry Miller. The Durrell-Miller Letters 1935-80 (1988).

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  • Old age is an insult. It's like being smacked.
    Lawrence Durrell (1912-1990), British author. Sunday Times (London, Nov. 20, 1988).
  • Everyone loathes his own country and countrymen if he is any sort of artist.
    Lawrence Durrell (1912-1990), British author. The Durrell-Miller Letters 1935-1980 (1988). Letter, March 1948, to Henry Miller.
  • It's unthinkable not to love—you'd have a severe nervous breakdown. Or you'd have to be Philip Larkin.
    Lawrence Durrell (1912-1990), British author. Interview in Observer (London, November 11, 1990).

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