Quotations From LEONTINE YOUNG


 

  • Cuteness in children is totally an adult perspective. The children themselves are unaware that the quality exists, let alone its desirability, until the reactions of grownups inform them.
    Leontine Young (20th century), U.S. social worker and author. Life Among the Giants, ch. 12 (1965).

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  • The smaller the person, the less we worry about his dignity. Sometimes we even find the idea a little ludicrous as if smallness and inexperience were incompatible with anything so majestic as human dignity....Yet children have a great sense of their own dignity. They couldn't define what it is but they know when it has been violated.
    Leontine Young (20th century), U.S. social worker and author. Life Among the Giants, ch. 12 (1965).

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  • No one knows better than children how much they need the authority that protects, that sets the outer limits of behavior with known and prescribed consequences. As one little boy expressed it to his mother, "You care what I do."
    Leontine Young (20th century), U.S. social worker and author. Life Among the Giants, ch. 16 (1965).

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  • The indispensable ingredient of any game worth its salt is that the children themselves play it and, if not its sole authors, share in its creation. Watching TV's ersatz battles is not the same thing at all. Children act out their emotions, they don't talk them out and they don't watch them out. Their imagination and their muscles need each other.
    Leontine Young (20th century), U.S. social worker and author. Life Among the Giants, ch. 17 (1965).

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  • Unfortunately the laughter of adults too often carries to the ears of the young the ring of ridicule, that annihilating enemy of human dignity. Like grownups, children enjoy participating in a joke and appreciate admiration of their wit and cleverness, but do not enjoy being the butt of the jokes
    Leontine Young (20th century), U.S. social worker and author. Life Among the Giants, ch. 12 (1965).

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  • It's likely that adults from the caveman on have created their own fantasies of what children ought to be like and naturally have been convinced that's precisely how as children they themselves were.
    Leontine Young (20th century), U.S. social worker and author. Life Among the Giants, introduction (1965).

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  • [Children] do not yet lie to themselves and therefore have not entered upon that important tacit agreement which marks admission into the adult world, to wit, that I will respect your lies if you will agree to let mine alone. That unwritten contract is one of the clear dividing lines between the world of childhood and the world of adulthood.
    Leontine Young (20th century), U.S. social worker and author. Life Among the Giants, ch. 2 (1965).

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  • The point is children lie to others for good and sufficient reasons, but they don't kid themselves. They know who did what, but they feel no moral imperative to inform grownups.
    Leontine Young (20th century), U.S. social worker and author. Life Among the Giants, ch. 2 (1965).

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  • [How] the young . . . can grow from the primitive to the civilized, from emotional anarchy to the disciplined freedom of maturity without losing the joy of spontaneity and the peace of self-honesty is a problem of education that no school and no culture have ever solved.
    Leontine Young (20th century), U.S. social worker and author. Life Among the Giants, ch. 1 (1965).

    Read more quotations about / on: honesty, school, culture, education, joy, peace, freedom
  • We honor motherhood with glowing sentimentality, but we don't rate it high on the scale of creative occupations.
    Leontine Young (20th century), U.S. social worker and author. Life Among the Giants, introduction (1965).
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