Learn More

Quotations From LILLIAN BRESLOW RUBIN


 

  • It's true, as Marya Mannes says: "No one believes [a woman's] time to be sacred. A man at his desk in a room with a closed door is a man at work. A woman at a desk in any room is available."
    Lillian Breslow Rubin (20th century), U.S. sociologist and family therapist. Women of a Certain Age, ch. 1 (1979).

    Read more quotations about / on: woman, work, time
  • Women find ways to give sense and meaning to daily life—ways to be useful in the community, to keep mind active and soul growing even while they change diapers and cook vegetables.
    Lillian Breslow Rubin (20th century), U.S. sociologist and family therapist. Women of a Certain Age, ch. 3 (1979).

    Read more quotations about / on: change, women, life
  • ... in the working class, the process of building a family, of making a living for it, of nurturing and maintaining the individuals in it "costs worlds of pain."
    Lillian Breslow Rubin (b. 1924), U.S. sociologist, family counselor, and author. Worlds of Pain, epilogue (1976). These are the final words of her study. Rubin, who had herself grown up in a working-class family, drew her title from this stanza of "The Everlasting Mercy," a poem by John Masefield: "To get the whole world out of bed/And washed, and dressed, and warmed, and fed,/To work, and back to bed again,/Believe me, Saul, costs worlds of pain."

    Read more quotations about / on: pain, family
[Hata Bildir]