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Quotations From MARCEL PROUST


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  • Time passes, and little by little everything that we have spoken in falsehood becomes true.
    Marcel Proust (1871-1922), French novelist. "The Fugitive," vol. 3, Remembrance of Things Past (1925), trans. by Terence Kilmartin (1981).

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  • The regularity of a habit is generally in proportion to its absurdity.
    Marcel Proust (1871-1922), French novelist. "The Captive," vol. 9, pt. 1, ch. 1, Remembrance of Things Past (1922, trans. 1929).
  • We are able to find everything in our memory, which is like a dispensary or chemical laboratory in which chance steers our hand sometimes to a soothing drug and sometimes to a dangerous poison.
    Marcel Proust (1871-1922), French novelist. "The Captive," vol. 10, pt. 2, ch. 3, Remembrance of Things Past (1923), trans. by Ronald and Colette Cortie (1988).

    Read more quotations about / on: sometimes, memory
  • What a profound significance small things assume when the woman we love conceals them from us.
    Marcel Proust (1871-1922), French novelist. "The Captive," pt. 1, ch. 1, Remembrance of Things Past, vol. 9 (1923) trans. by Ronald and Colette Cortie (1988).

    Read more quotations about / on: woman, love
  • People who are not in love fail to understand how an intelligent man can suffer because of a very ordinary woman. This is like being surprised that anyone should be stricken with cholera because of a creature so insignificant as the common bacillus.
    Marcel Proust (1871-1922), French novelist. "Swann's Way: Swann in Love," vol. 2, Remembrance of Things Past (1913), trans. by Scott Monkrieff (1922).

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  • The disinterest [of my two great-aunts] in anything that had to do with high society was such that their sense of hearing ... put to rest its receptor organs and allowed them to suffer the true beginnings of atrophy.
    Marcel Proust (1871-1922), French novelist. Nouvelle Revue Française (1913). Remembrance of Things Past, vol. I, Swann's Way, p. 21, Pléiade (1954).
  • In a separation it is the one who is not really in love who says the more tender things.
    Marcel Proust (1871-1922), French novelist. "The Captive," vol. 10, pt. 2, ch. 3, Remembrance of Things Past (1923), trans. by Ronald Cortie and Colette Cortie (1988).

    Read more quotations about / on: love
  • Even the simple act that we call "going to visit a person of our acquaintance" is in part an intellectual act. We fill the physical appearance of the person we see with all the notions we have about him, and in the totality of our impressions about him, these notions play the most important role.
    Marcel Proust (1871-1922), French novelist. Nouvelle Revue Française (1913). Remembrance of Things Past, vol. I, Swann's Way, p. 19, Pléiade (1954).
  • A sleeping man holds in a circle around him the thread of the hours, the order of years and of worlds. He consults them instinctively upon awaking and in one second reads in them the point of the earth that he occupies, the time past until his arousal; but their ranks can be mingled or broken.
    Marcel Proust (1871-1922), French novelist. Nouvelle Revue Française (1913). Remembrance of Things Past, vol. I, Swann's Way, p. 5, Pléiade (1954).

    Read more quotations about / on: broken, time
  • A few years later, I would have answered, "I never repeat anything." That is the ritual phrase of society people, by which the gossip is reassured every time.
    Marcel Proust (1871-1922), French novelist. Nouvelle Revue Française (1918). Remembrance of Things Past, vol. II, Within a Budding Grove, p. 571, Pléiade (1954).

    Read more quotations about / on: time, people
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