Quotations From MARCUS TULLIUS CICERO

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  • 61.
    Men decide far more problems by hate, love, lust, rage, sorrow, joy, hope, fear, illusion, or some other inward emotion than by reality, authority, any legal standard, judicial precedent, or statute.
    Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43 B.C.), Roman orator, philosopher, statesman. De Oratore, III, 100.

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  • 62.
    It shows nobility to be willing to increase your debt to a man to whom you already owe much.
    Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43 B.C.), Roman orator, philosopher, statesman. Epistulae ad Familiares, II, 6, 2.
  • 63.
    What times! What manners! The Senate knows these things, the consul sees them, and yet this man lives.
    Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43 B.C.), Roman orator, philosopher, statesman. I, 1.
  • 64.
    If I err in belief that the souls of men are immortal, I gladly err, nor do I wish this error which gives me pleasure to be wrested from me while I live.
    Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43 B.C.), Roman orator, philosopher, statesman. De Senectute, 85.
  • 65.
    It is a crime to put a Roman citizen in chains, it is an enormity to flog one, sheer murder to slay one: what, then, shall I say of crucifixion? It is impossible to find the word for such an abomination.
    Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43 B.C.), Roman orator, philosopher, statesman. II, v, 170.

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  • 66.
    Though silence is not necessarily an admission, it is not a denial, either.
    Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43 B.C.), Roman orator, philosopher, statesman. Paulus, L, 17.

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  • 67.
    Friendship is nothing else than an accord in all things, human and divine, conjoined with mutual goodwill and affection, and I am inclined to think that, with the exception of wisdom, no better thing has been given to man by the immortal gods
    Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43 B.C.), Roman orator, philosopher, statesman. De Amicitia, 20.
  • 68.
    The highest good. [summum bonum.]
    Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43 B.C.), Roman orator and philosopher. De Officiis, bk. 1, ch. 5 (44 B.C.).
  • 69.
    I never heard of an old man forgetting where he had buried his money! Old people remember what interests them: the dates fixed for their lawsuits, and the names of their debtors and creditors.
    Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43 B.C.), Roman orator, philosopher. De Senectute, ch. 6, sct. 20 (44 B.C.).

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  • 70.
    Those wars are unjust which are undertaken without provocation. For only a war waged for revenge or defense can be just.
    Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43 B.C.), Roman orator, philosopher, statesman. De re publica, 35.

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