Quotations From MARGARET FULLER

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  • 11.
    For precocity some great price is always demanded sooner or later in life.
    Margaret Fuller (1810-1850), U.S. author, literary critic, journalist. quoted in Margaret Fuller Ossoli, p. 289, Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Houghton, Mifflin and Co., Boston (1898).

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  • 12.
    It is not because the touch of genius has roused genius to production, but because the admiration of genius has made talent ambitious, that the harvest is still so abundant.
    Margaret Fuller (1810-1850), U.S. writer, lecturer. "The Modern Drama," Art, Literature and the Drama (1858).
  • 13.
    How many persons must there be who cannot worship alone since they are content with so little.
    Margaret Fuller (1810-1850), U.S. author, literary critic, journalist. letter, December 31, 1843, to Rev. W.H. Channing, quoted in Margaret Fuller Ossoli, p. 184, Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Houghton, Mifflin and Co., Boston (1898).

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  • 14.
    This was one of the rye-bread days, all dull and damp without.
    Margaret Fuller (1810-1850), U.S. author, literary critic, journalist. diary entry, quoted in Margaret Fuller Ossoli, p. 104, Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Houghton, Mifflin and Co., Boston (1898).
  • 15.
    Men disappoint me so, I disappoint myself so, yet courage, patience, shuffle the cards ...
    Margaret Fuller (1810-1850), U.S. author, literary critic, journalist. letter, February 21, 1841, to Rev. W.H. Channing, quoted in Margaret Fuller Ossoli, p. 112, Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Houghton, Mifflin and Co., Boston (1898).

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  • 16.
    We doubt not the destiny of our country—that she is to accomplish great things for human nature, and be the mother of a nobler race than the world has yet known. But she has been so false to the scheme made out at her nativity, that it is now hard to say which way that destiny points.
    Margaret Fuller (1810-1850), U.S. author, literary critic, journalist. Life Without and Life Within, p. 108,"American Facts," ed. Arthur B. Fuller, Brown, Taggard and Chase, Boston (1860).

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  • 17.
    The especial genius of women I believe to be electrical in movement, intuitive in function, spiritual in tendency.
    Margaret Fuller (1810-1850), U.S. writer, lecturer. "The Great Lawsuit," The Dial (July 1843).

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  • 18.
    I now know all the people worth knowing in America, and I find no intellect comparable to my own.
    Margaret Fuller (1810-1850), U.S. writer, lecturer. quoted in Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli, vol. 1, pt. 4, Ralph Waldo Emerson (1884), repr. (1972). reported to have been uttered at Emerson's table. Emerson wrote only this section: other sections of Memoirs are by William Henry Channing and James Freeman Clarke.

    Read more quotations about / on: america, people
  • 19.
    I stand in the sunny noon of life. Objects no longer glitter in the dews of morning, neither are yet softened by the shadows of evening.
    Margaret Fuller (1810-1850), U.S. author, literary critic, journalist. Quote from Woman in the Nineteenth Century. Brilliant Bylines, p. 15, Barbara Belford, Columbia University Press, New York (1986).

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  • 20.
    Essays, entitled critical, are epistles addressed to the public, through which the mind of the recluse relieves itself of its impressions.
    Margaret Fuller (1810-1850), U.S. writer, lecturer. "A Short Essay on Critics," Art, Literature and the Drama (1858).
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