Treasure Island

Quotations From MARY BARNETT GILSON

 

  • 11.
    ... there are persons who seem to have overcome obstacles and by character and perseverance to have risen to the top. But we have no record of the numbers of able persons who fall by the wayside, persons who, with enough encouragement and opportunity, might make great contributions.
    Mary Barnett Gilson (1877-?), U.S. factory personnel manager, economist, and educator. What's Past is Prologue, ch. 12 (1940).
  • 12.
    The correct rate of speed in innovating changes in long-standing social customs has not yet been determined by even the most expert of the experts. Personally I am beginning to think there is more danger in lagging than in speeding up cultural change to keep pace with mechanical change.
    Mary Barnett Gilson (1877-?), U.S. factory personnel manager, economist, and educator. What's Past is Prologue, ch. 17 (1940).

    Read more quotations about / on: change
  • 13.
    ... every experience in life enriches one's background and should teach valuable lessons.
    Mary Barnett Gilson (1877-?), U.S. factory personnel manager, economist, and educator. What's Past is Prologue, ch. 24 (1940).

    Read more quotations about / on: life
  • 14.
    ... education fails in so far as it does not stir in students a sharp awareness of their obligations to society and furnish at least a few guideposts pointing toward the implementation of these obligations.
    Mary Barnett Gilson (1877-?), U.S. factory personnel manager, economist, and educator. What's Past is Prologue, ch. 25 (1940).

    Read more quotations about / on: education
  • 15.
    Probably nothing in the experience of the rank and file of workers causes more bitterness and envy than the realization which comes sooner or later to many of them that they are "stuck" and can go no further.
    Mary Barnett Gilson (1877-?), U.S. factory personnel manager, economist, and educator. What's Past is Prologue, ch. 7 (1940).
  • 16.
    Until the sky is the limit [for women], as it is for men, men as well as women will suffer, because all society is affected when half of it is denied equal opportunity for full development.
    Mary Barnett Gilson (1877-?), U.S. factory personnel manager, economist, and educator. What's Past is Prologue, ch. 26 (1940).

    Read more quotations about / on: women, sky
  • 17.
    To find ways of practicing democracy, not ways of orating about it, is our great problem.
    Mary Barnett Gilson (1877-?), U.S. factory personnel manager, economist, and educator. What's Past is Prologue, ch. 27 (1940).
  • 18.
    One of the baffling things about life is that the purposes of institutions may be ideal, while their administration, dependent upon the faults and weaknesses of human beings, may be bad.
    Mary Barnett Gilson (1877-?), U.S. factory personnel manager, economist, and educator. What's Past is Prologue, ch. 27 (1940). Speaking specifically of trade unions.

    Read more quotations about / on: life
  • 19.
    During the first World War women in the United States had a chance to try their capacities in wider fields of executive leadership in industry. Must we always wait for war to give us opportunity? And must the pendulum always swing back in the busy world of work and workers during times of peace?
    Mary Barnett Gilson (1877-?), U.S. factory personnel manager, economist, and educator. What's Past is Prologue, ch. 26 (1940).

    Read more quotations about / on: war, peace, world, work, women
  • 20.
    Women cannot claim the right to be considered mature and responsible until they decide the course of their lives for themselves and refuse to be a "manipulated group." They will not be truly emancipated until ... the right to work is a matter of course and not of discussion.
    Mary Barnett Gilson (1877-?), U.S. factory personnel manager, economist, and educator. What's Past is Prologue, ch. 26 (1940).

    Read more quotations about / on: work, women
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