Treasure Island

Quotations From MAX FRISCH

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  • 1.
    Above all, however, the machine has no feelings, it feels no fear and no hope ... it operates according to the pure logic of probability. For this reason I assert that the robot perceives more accurately than man.
    Max Frisch (1911-1991), Swiss author, critic. Originally published as Homo faberEin Bericht, Suhrkamp (1957). Homo FaberA Report, p. 73, trans. by Michael Bullock (1977), Abelard-Schuman (1959). Symptomatic of Walter Faber's machine fetishism.

    Read more quotations about / on: hope, fear
  • 2.
    The technologist was the final guise of the white missionary, industrialization the last gospel of a dying race and living standards a substitute for a purpose in living.
    Max Frisch (1911-1991), Swiss author, critic. Originally published as Homo faberEin Bericht, Suhrkamp (1957). Homo FaberA Report, pp. 50-51, trans. by Michael Bullock (1977), Abelard-Schuman (1959). Marcel's critique of modernity's obsession with technology.

    Read more quotations about / on: dying
  • 3.
    Technology as the knack of eliminating the world as resistance,... the technologist's worldlessness.... My mistake lay in the fact that we technologists try to live without death.
    Max Frisch (1911-1991), Swiss author, critic. Originally published as Homo faberEin Bericht, Suhrkamp (1957). Homo FaberA Report, pp. 165-166, trans. by Michael Bullock (1977), Abelard-Schuman (1959). Walter Faber's renouncing of his technological world view.

    Read more quotations about / on: death, world
  • 4.
    "In your company a man could die," I said, "a man could die and you wouldn't even notice, there's no trace of friendship, a man could die in your company."
    Max Frisch (1911-1991), Swiss author, critic. Originally published as Homo faberEin Bericht, Suhrkamp (1957). Homo Faber: A Report, p. 66, trans. by Michael Bullock (1977), Abelard-Schuman (1959). Walter Faber's drunken critique of modern U.S. society.
  • 5.
    It is always the moralists who do the most harm. Abortion is the logical outcome of civilization, only the jungle gives birth and moulders away as nature decrees. Man plans.
    Max Frisch (1911-1991), Swiss author, critic. Originally published as Homo faberEin Bericht, Suhrkamp (1957). Homo FaberA Report, p. 102, trans. by Michael Bullock (1977), Abelard-Schuman (1959). Walter Faber's comments about abortion are ironic, as he falls in love with his own daughter, ignorant of the fact that her mother did not abort her as planned.

    Read more quotations about / on: birth, nature
  • 6.
    Technology ... the knack of so arranging the world that we don't have to experience it.
    Max Frisch (b. 1911), Swiss author, architect. Hanna, in "Second Stop," Homo Faber (1957, trans. 1959).

    Read more quotations about / on: world
  • 7.
    They talked about "sex problems" with such premature candor, with the enlightened frankness of eunuchs who don't know what they are talking about. Nobody here seemed to see any difference between sex and eroticism.
    Max Frisch (1911-1991), Swiss author, critic. Originally published as Stiller, Suhrkamp (1954). I'm Not Stiller, sixth notebook, p. 271, trans. by Michael Bullock, Vintage (1958). Sybille's encounter with U.S. society in the 1950s.
  • 8.
    You can put anything into words, except your own life.
    Max Frisch (1911-1991), Swiss author, critic. Originally published as Stiller, Suhrkamp (1954). Stiller, in I'm Not Stiller, first notebook, p. 54, trans. by Michael Bullock (1958), Vintage (1958). Epitomizing the novels central theme of modern man's problematic identity.

    Read more quotations about / on: life
  • 9.
    Ballet remained the only outlet for her sensuality.
    Max Frisch (1911-1991), Swiss author, critic. Originally published as Stiller, Suhrkamp (1954). Stiller, in I'm Not Stiller, second notebook, p. 83, trans. by Michael Bullock, Vintage (1958). On Julika, Stiller's wife.
  • 10.
    There are all sorts of ways of murdering a person or at least his soul, and that's something no police in the world can spot.
    Max Frisch (1911-1991), Swiss author, critic. Originally published as Stiller, Suhrkamp (1954). Stiller, in I'm Not Stiller, second notebook, p. 111, trans. by Michael Bullock, Vintage (1958).

    Read more quotations about / on: world
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