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Quotations From MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

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  • 201.
    No man is exempt from saying silly things; the mischief is to say them deliberately.
    Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. "Of the Useful and the Honorable," The Essays (Les Essais), bk. III, ch. 1, Abel Langelier, Paris (1588).
  • 202.
    What fear has once made me will, I am bound still to will when without fear.
    Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. "Of the Useful and the Honorable," The Essays (Les Essais), bk. III, ch. 1, Abel Langelier, Paris (1588).

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  • 203.
    There is no desire more natural than the desire for knowledge.
    Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. "Of Experience," The Essays (Les Essais), bk. III, ch. 13, Abel Langelier, Paris (1588).
  • 204.
    Seeing that the Senses cannot decide our dispute, being themselves full of uncertainty, we must have recourse to Reason; there is no reason but must be built upon another reason: so here we are retreating backwards to infinity.
    Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. "Apology for Raimund Sebond," p. 49, The Essays of Montaigne, vol. II, trans. by E.J. Trechmann, Oxford University Press, New York and London (n.d.). Unreliability of the senses makes everything uncertain.
  • 205.
    Whoever will imagine a perpetual confession of ignorance, a judgment without leaning or inclination, on any occasion whatever, has a conception of Pyrrhonism.
    Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist and philosopher. "Apology for Raymond Sebond," Complete Essays of Montaigne, trans. by Donald M. Frame (1965).

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  • 206.
    I do not care so much what I am to others as I care what I am to myself.
    Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. "Of Glory," The Essays (Les Essais), bk. II, ch. 16, Simon Millanges, Bordeaux, first edition (1580).
  • 207.
    What kind of truth can that be that is bounded by these mountains, and that becomes a lie to the people on the other side of them?
    Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. "Apology For Raymond Sebond," The Essays (Les Essais), bk. II, ch. 12, Abel Langelier, Paris (1595).

    Read more quotations about / on: truth, people
  • 208.
    Those who have likened our life to a dream were more right, by chance, than they realized. We are awake while sleeping, and waking sleep.
    Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. Essays, bk. 2, ch. 12 (1588). See Poe on dreams, Calderón on life.

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  • 209.
    If my intentions were not to be read in my eyes and voice, I should not have survived so long without quarrels and without harm, seeing the indiscreet freedom with which I say, right or wrong, whatever comes into my head.
    Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. "Of Physiognomy," The Essays (Les Essais), bk. III, ch. 12, Abel Langelier, Paris (1588).

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  • 210.
    Socrates, who was a perfect model in all great qualities, ... hit on a body and face so ugly and so incongruous with the beauty of his soul, he who was so madly in love with beauty.
    Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. "Of Physiognomy," The Essays (Les Essais), bk. III, ch. 12, Abel Langelier, Paris (1588).

    Read more quotations about / on: beauty, perfect, love
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