Quotations From MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE

» More about Michel de Montaigne on Poemhunter

 

  • My errors are by now natural and incorrigible; but the good that worthy men do the public by making themselves imitable, I shall perhaps do by making myself evitable.
    Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. "Of the Art of Discussion," The Essays (Les Essais), bk. III, ch. 8, Abel Langelier, Paris (1588).
  • Have you known how to take rest? You have done more than he who hath taken empires and cities.
    Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. "Of Experience," bk. 3, ch. 13, Essays, trans. by John Florio (1588).
  • There is nothing like arousing appetite and affection; otherwise all you make out of them is asses loaded with books.
    Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. "Of the Education of Children," The Essays (Les Essais), bk. I, ch. 26, Simon Millanges, Bordeaux, first edition (1580).
  • The worst condition of humans is when they lose knowledge and control of themselves.
    Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. "Of Drunkenness":, The Essays (Les Essais), bk. II, ch. 2, Abel Langelier, Paris (1595).
  • The most fruitful and natural exercise of our mind, in my opinion, is discussion. I find it sweeter than any other action of our life.
    Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. "Of the Art of Discussion," The Essays (Les Essais), bk. III, ch. 8, Abel Langelier, Paris (1588).

    Read more quotations about / on: life
  • I honor most those to whom I show least honor; and where my soul moves with great alacrity, I forget the proper steps of ceremony.
    Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. "A Consideration Upon Cicero," The Essays (Les Essais), bk. I, ch. 40, Abel Langelier, Paris (1595).
  • Example is a bright looking-glass, universal and for all shapes to look into.
    Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. "Of Experience," bk. 3, ch. 13, Essays, trans. by John Florio (1588).
  • If I am to serve as an instrument of deceit, at least let it be with a clear conscience. I do not want to be considered either so affectionate or so loyal a servant as to be found fit to betray anyone.
    Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. "Of the Useful and the Honorable," The Essays (Les Essais), bk. III, ch. 1, Abel Langelier, Paris (1588).
  • A wellborn mind that is practiced in dealing with people makes itself thoroughly agreeable by itself. Art is nothing else but the list and record of the productions of such minds.
    Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. "Of Three Kinds of Association," The Essays (Les Essais), bk. III, ch. 3, Abel Langelier, Paris (1588).

    Read more quotations about / on: people
  • To honor him whom we have made is far from honoring him that hath made us.
    Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. "An Apology of Raimond Sebond," bk. 2, ch. 12, Essays (1580; trans. by John Florio).
[Hata Bildir]