Treasure Island

Quotations From MOLIÈRE [JEAN BAPTISTE POQUELIN]

 

  • 71.
    In society one needs a flexible virtue; too much goodness can be blamable.
    Molière [Jean Baptiste Poquelin] (1622-1673), French comic playwright. Philinte, in The Misanthrope, act 1, sc. 1 (1666).
  • 72.
    What a terrible thing to be a great lord, yet a wicked man.
    Molière [Jean Baptiste Poquelin] (1622-1673), French comic playwright. Sganarelle, in Dom Juan, act 1, sc. 1 (1665).
  • 73.
    Public scandal is what makes the offense; sinning in private is not sinning at all.
    Molière [Jean Baptiste Poquelin] (1622-1673), French comic playwright. Tartuffe, in Tartuffe. Act 4, sc. 5 (1664). The hypocrite Tartuffe tries to seduce the virtuous wife.
  • 74.
    If you make yourself understood, you're always speaking well.
    Molière [Jean Baptiste Poquelin] (1622-1673), French comic playwright. The servant Martine, in The Learned Ladies (Les Femmes Savantes), act 2, sc. 6 (1672).
  • 75.
    I have the fault of being a little more sincere than is proper.
    Molière [Jean Baptiste Poquelin] (1622-1673), French comic playwright. Alceste, in The Misanthrope, act 1, sc. 2 (1666).
  • 76.
    It is fine for a woman to know a lot; but I don't want her to have this shocking desire to be learned for learnedness sake. When I ask a woman a question, I like her to pretend to ignore what she really knows.
    Molière [Jean Baptiste Poquelin] (1622-1673), French comic playwright. Clitandre, in The Learned Ladies (Les Femmes Savantes), act 1, sc. 3 (1672).

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  • 77.
    They [zealots] would have everybody be as blind as themselves: to them, to be clear-sighted is libertinism.
    Molière [Jean Baptiste Poquelin] (1622-1673), French comic playwright. Cléante, in Tartuffe, act 1, sc. 5 (1664).
  • 78.
    He's a wonderful talker, who has the art of telling you nothing in a great harangue.
    Molière [Jean Baptiste Poquelin] (1622-1673), French dramatist. Célimène, in Le Misanthrope, act 2, sc. 5.
  • 79.
    In order to prove a friend to one's guests, frugality must reign in one's meals; and, according to an ancient saying, one must eat to live, not live to eat.
    Molière [Jean Baptiste Poquelin] (1622-1673), French comic playwright. Valère, in L'Avare (The Miser), act 3, sc. 1 (1669). Valère seeks to please the miser. The expression "eat to live and not live to eat" comes from Cicero (Rhetoric ad Herennium), but is famous in the French tradition as a quote from l'Avare.

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  • 80.
    One should eat to live, not live to eat.
    Molière [Jean Baptiste Poquelin] (1622-1673), French dramatist. Valère, in The Miser, act 3, sc. 1, l. 149 (1669).
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