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Quotations From NORMAN DOUGLAS

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  • 1.
    I wish the English still possessed a shred of the old sense of humour which Puritanism, and dyspepsia, and newspaper reading, and tea-drinking have nearly extinguished.
    Norman Douglas (1868-1952), British author. South Wind, ch. 32 (1917).
  • 2.
    Shall I give you my recipe for happiness? I find everything useful and nothing indispensable. I find everything wonderful and nothing miraculous. I reverence the body. I avoid first causes like the plague.
    Norman Douglas (1868-1952), British author. Mr. Keith, in South Wind, ch. 18 (1917).

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  • 3.
    Many a man who thinks to found a home discovers that he has merely opened a tavern for his friends.
    Norman Douglas (1868-1952), British author. Mr. Keith, in South Wind, ch. 24 (1917).

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  • 4.
    Nobody can misunderstand a boy like his own mother.... Mothers at present can bring children into the world, but this performance is apt to mark the end of their capacities. They can't even attend to the elementary animal requirements of their offspring. It is quite surprising how many children survive in spite of their mothers.
    Norman Douglas (1868-1952), British author. Mr. Keith, in South Wind, ch. 22 (1917).

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  • 5.
    What is all wisdom save a collection of platitudes? Take fifty of our current proverbial sayings—they are so trite, so threadbare, that we can hardly bring our lips to utter them. None the less they embody the concentrated experience of the race and the man who orders his life according to their teaching cannot go far wrong.
    Norman Douglas (1868-1952), British author. Count Caloveglia's "old teacher," in South Wind, ch. 16 (1917).

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  • 6.
    You can tell the ideals of a nation by its advertisements.
    Norman Douglas (1868-1952), British author. Don Francesco, in South Wind, ch. 7 (1917).
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