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Quotations From NUNNALLY JOHNSON

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  • I'm right here to tell you, mister. There ain't nobody gonna push me off my land. My grandpa took up this land seventy years ago. My pa was born here. We was all born on it. And some of us was killed on it. And some of us died on it. That's what makes it ourn. Bein' born on it. And workin' on it. And dyin' on it. And not no piece of paper with writin' on it.
    Nunnally Johnson (1897-1977), U.S. screenwriter, and John Ford. Muley (John Qualen), The Grapes of Wrath (1940). Telling the representative from the bank that he will not leave his home and property. Based on the novel by John Steinbeck.
  • Them Oakies got no sense and no feeling. They ain't human. No human being wouldn't live the way they do. A human being couldn't stand it to be so miserable.
    Nunnally Johnson (1897-1977), U.S. screenwriter. Second Gas Station Attendant (Robert Shaw), The Grapes of Wrath, after the Joads leave the gas station (1940).
  • Listen, that's the one that done it. The dusters. They started it anyways. Blowin' like this year after year. Blowin' the land away. Blowin' the crops away. Blowin' us away now.
    Nunnally Johnson (1897-1977), U.S. screenwriter, and John Ford. Muley (John Qualen), The Grapes of Wrath, explaining to Tom Joad, who is returning home from prison, that the perpetual dust storms have finally forced his family and others to leave their homes (1940). Based on the novel by John Steinbeck.
  • Well, Pa, a woman can change better than a man. A man lives, sort of, well, in jerks. A baby's born or somebody dies and that's a jerk. He gets a farm or loses it and that's a jerk. With a woman, it's all in one flow, like a stream. Little eddies and waterfalls, but the river, it goes right on. A woman looks at it that way.
    Nunnally Johnson (1897-1977), U.S. screenwriter, and John Ford. Ma Joad (Jane Darwell), The Grapes of Wrath, reply when Pa says she's the one who keeps the family going (1940). Based on the novel by John Steinbeck.

    Read more quotations about / on: woman, baby, river, change
  • Scared, huh. I ain't never gonna be scared no more. I was though. For a while it looked as though we was beat, good and beat. Looked like we didn't have nobody in the whole wide world but enemies. Like nobody was friendly no more. Made me feel kind a bad and scared too. Like we was lost and nobody cared.
    Nunnally Johnson (1897-1977), U.S. screenwriter, and John Ford. Ma Joad (Jane Darwell), The Grapes of Wrath, replying to her son Al (O.Z. Whitehead) who asks if she's scared, as the Joads head off in search of work (1940). Based on the novel by John Steinbeck.

    Read more quotations about / on: lost, world
  • I know. That's what makes us tough. Rich fellows come up and they die. Their kids ain't no good and they die out. But we keepa comin'. We're the people that live. They can't wipe us out. They can't lick us. We'll go on forever, Pa, cause we're the people.
    Nunnally Johnson (1897-1977), U.S. screenwriter, and John Ford. Ma Joad (Jane Darwell), The Grapes of Wrath, pronouncement at the end of the film, as the Joad family drives on in search of opportunity (1940). Based on the novel by John Steinbeck.

    Read more quotations about / on: forever, people
  • Well, there she is folks. The land of milk and honey—California.
    Nunnally Johnson (1897-1977), U.S. screenwriter, and John Ford. Ma Joad (Jane Darwell), The Grapes of Wrath (1940). At the Joad family's first sight of California. Based on the novel by John Steinbeck.
  • As soon as the harvest is in, you're a migrant worker. Afterwards just a bum.
    Nunnally Johnson (1897-1977), U.S. screenwriter. Frank (David Hughes), The Grapes of Wrath (1940).
  • Maybe it's like Casey says. A fellow ain't got a soul of his own. Just a little piece of a big soul. The one big soul that belongs to everybody.
    Nunnally Johnson (1897-1977), U.S. screenwriter, and John Ford. Tom Joad (Henry Fonda), The Grapes of Wrath (1940). Expressing his thoughts to Ma Joad (Jane Darwell) about men's connection to one another. Based on the novel by John Steinbeck.
  • I wouldn't pray just for a old man that's dead because he's all right. If I was to pray, I'd pray for the folks that's alive and don't know which way to turn. Grampa here, he ain't got no more trouble like that. He's got his job all cut out for him. So cover him up and let him get to it.
    Nunnally Johnson (1897-1977), U.S. screenwriter. Casy (John Carradine), The Grapes of Wrath, as Grampa is being buried (1940).

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