Learn More

Quotations From OSCAR WILDE


» More about Oscar Wilde on Poemhunter

 

  • I never approve, or disapprove, of anything now. It is an absurd attitude to take towards life. We are not sent into the world to air our moral prejudices. I never take any notice of what common people say, and I never interfere with what charming people do.
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in the The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 6 (1891).

    Read more quotations about / on: people, world, life
  • His style is chaos illumined by flashes of lightning. As a writer he has mastered everything except language.
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Vivian, in "The Decay of Lying," Intentions (1891). Of author George Meredith.

    Read more quotations about / on: chaos
  • There are many things that we would throw away if we were not afraid that others might pick them up.
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 4 (1891).
  • To give an accurate description of what has never occurred is not merely the proper occupation of the historian, but the inalienable privilege of any man of parts and culture.
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Gilbert, in The Critic as Artist, pt. 1, published in Intentions (1891).

    Read more quotations about / on: culture
  • We Irish are too poetical to be poets; we are a nation of brilliant failures, but we are the greatest talkers since the Greeks.
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Quoted in Richard Ellman, Oscar Wilde, ch. 11 (1987). Said, Christmas 1888, to poet W.B. Yeats.
  • Murder is always a mistake. One should never do anything that one cannot talk about after dinner.
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 19 (1891).

    Read more quotations about / on: murder
  • A person who, because he has corns himself, always treads on other people's toes.
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. The Roman Candle, in "The Remarkable Rocket," The Happy Prince and Other Tales (1888). Answering the question, "What is a sensitive person?"

    Read more quotations about / on: people
  • Whatever harsh criticisms may be passed on the construction of her sentences, she at least possesses that one touch of vulgarity that makes the whole world kin.
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Book review. Pall Mall Gazette (London, Oct. 28, 1886).

    Read more quotations about / on: world
  • The husbands of very beautiful women belong to the criminal classes.
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 15 (1891).

    Read more quotations about / on: beautiful, women
  • Sympathy with joy intensifies the sum of sympathy in the world, sympathy with pain does not really diminish the amount of pain.
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. "The Soul of Man Under Socialism," Fortnightly Review.

    Read more quotations about / on: sympathy, pain, joy, world
[Hata Bildir]