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Quotations From OSCAR WILDE

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  • 31.
    Who is that man over there? I don't know him. What is he doing? Is he a conspirator? Have you searched him? Give him till tomorrow to confess, then hang him!—hang him!
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. The Czar, in Vera, or the Nihilists, act 2. Prince Paul replies, "Sire, you are anticipating history. This is Count Petouchof, your new Ambassador to Berlin."

    Read more quotations about / on: tomorrow
  • 32.
    As a wicked man I am a complete failure. Why, there are lots of people who say I have never really done anything wrong in the whole course of my life. Of course they only say it behind my back.
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Darlington, in Lady Windermere's Fan, act 1.

    Read more quotations about / on: people, life
  • 33.
    There's nothing in the world like the devotion of a married woman. It's a thing no married man knows anything about.
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Cecil Graham, in Lady Windermere's Fan, act 3.

    Read more quotations about / on: woman, world
  • 34.
    Cultivated leisure is the aim of man.
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. The Soul of Man under Socialism, Fortnightly Review (London, February 1890).
  • 35.
    He had that curious love of green, which in individuals is always the sign of a subtle artistic temperament, and in nations is said to denote a laxity, if not a decadence of morals.
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. "Pen, Pencil and Poison," Fortnightly Review (London, Jan. 1889).

    Read more quotations about / on: green, love
  • 36.
    I dislike arguments of any kind. They are always vulgar, and often convincing.
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lady Bracknell, in The Importance of Being Earnest, act 4 (1895). Wilde also wrote, "Arguments are extremely vulgar, for everybody in good society holds exactly the same opinions."M"The Remarkable Rocket," published in The Happy Prince and Other Tales (1888).
  • 37.
    One knows so well the popular idea of health. The English country gentleman galloping after a fox—the unspeakable in full pursuit of the uneatable.
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Illingworth, in A Woman of No Importance, act 1 (1893).
  • 38.
    There is nothing so difficult to marry as a large nose.
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lady Markby, in An Ideal Husband, act 1.
  • 39.
    The amount of women in London who flirt with their own husbands is perfectly scandalous. It looks so bad. It is simply washing one's clean linen in public.
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Algernon, in The Importance of Being Earnest, act 1.

    Read more quotations about / on: london, women
  • 40.
    Only mediocrities progress. An artist revolves in a cycle of masterpieces, the first of which is no less perfect than the last.
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Letter to the editor. Pall Mall Gazette (London, September 25, 1894).

    Read more quotations about / on: perfect
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