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Quotations From PIERRE CORNEILLE

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  • 51.
    An example is often a deceptive mirror, and the order of destiny, so troubling to our thoughts, is not always found written in things past.
    Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. The Emperor Augustus, in Cinna, act 2, sc. 1 (1641).

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  • 52.
    My sweetest hope is to lose hope.
    Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. The Infanta, in The Cid, act 1, sc. 2 (1637). The Infanta wishes to no longer vainly hope to marry a man below her station.

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  • 53.
    He who pardons easily invites offense.
    Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. The Emperor Augustus, in Cinna, act 4, sc. 2 (1641).
  • 54.
    Ever more blood, ever more torments! My cruelty is exhausted and yet cannot stop; I want to be feared, but I only provoke.
    Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. The Emperor Augustus, in Cinna, act 4, sc. 2 (1641).
  • 55.
    I am master of myself as of the universe, so I am; so I wish to be.
    Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. The Emperor Augustus, in Cinna, act 5, sc. 3 (1641). Augustus overcomes his anger and pardons the conspirators against his life.
  • 56.
    My generosity finally cedes to her hatred.
    Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. Nicomède, in Nicomède, act 3, sc. 4 (1651).
  • 57.
    After having won a scepter, few are so generous as to disdain the pleasures of ruling.
    Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. Maximus, in Cinna, act 2, sc. 1 (1641).
  • 58.
    He who punishes the vanquished fears not the victor.
    Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. Photis, in The Death of Pompey (La Mort de Pompée), act 1, sc. 1 (1642).
  • 59.
    One is often guilty by being too just.
    Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. Photis, in The Death of Pompey (La Mort de Pompée), act 1, sc. 1 (1642).
  • 60.
    What? Rome dares not desire what you desire? How do you use your absolute power?
    Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. Berenice, in Titus and Berenice (Tite et Bérénice), act 3, sc. 5 (1670). Berenice speaks to the Emperor Titus, who cannot marry her according to the laws of the senate.

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