Quotations From PIERRE CORNEILLE

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  • 61.
    Master of the universe but not of myself, I am the only rebel against my absolute power.
    Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. Titus, in Titus and Berenice (Tite et Bérénice), act 2, sc. 1 (1670). Titus trys to repress his love.

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  • 62.
    The Throne raises the majesty of kings above scorn and above laws.
    Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. Creon, in Medea, act 2, sc. 3 (1635).
  • 63.
    The people you killed seem to be in excellent health.
    Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. Cliton, in The Liar (Le Menteur), act 4, sc. 2 (1644). Cliton describes the people that the liar falsely claimed to have killed in a duel.

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  • 64.
    Oh, how sweet it is to pity the fate of an enemy who can no longer threaten us!
    Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. Cornelia, in The Death of Pompey (La Mort de Pompée), act 5, sc. 1 (1642).

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  • 65.
    A monarch must sometimes rule even himself: he who wants everything must risk very little.
    Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. Emperor Titus, in Titus and Berenice (Tite et Bérénice), act 4, sc. 5 (1670).

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  • 66.
    He who wearies of a king can weary of a father.
    Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. King Prusias, in Nicomède, act 2, sc. 1 (1651). The king speaks of his rebellious son.

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  • 67.
    Such subjects are the very strength of kings, and are thus above the law.
    Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. King Tullus, in Horace, act 5, sc. 3 (1641). King Tullus forgives the hero Horace, who has saved the state but killed his sister.

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  • 68.
    Clemency is the noblest trait which can reveal a true monarch to the world.
    Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. Livia, in Cinna, act 4, sc. 3 (1641). Livia urges her husband, Augustus, to pardon conspirators.

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  • 69.
    Tortures are to them what joys are to us.
    Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. Pauline, in Polyeucte, act 3, sc. 3 (1641). Pauline is a Roman, speaking of early Christians.
  • 70.
    Deceit is the game of petty spirits, and that is by nature a woman's quality.
    Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. Nicomède, in Nicomède, act 4, sc. 2 (1651).

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