Quotations From PIERRE CORNEILLE


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  • He who plays advisor is no longer ambassador.
    Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. Nicomède, in Nicomède, act 3, sc. 3 (1651).
  • My reason, it's true, controls my feelings, but whatever its authority, it doesn't rule them so much as tyrannize them.
    Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. Pauline, in Polyeucte, act 2, sc. 2 (1641).
  • The combat ended for want of combatants.
    Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. Rodrigue, in The Cid, act 4, sc. 3 (1637). Rodrigue recounts the defeat of an army having lost all their soldiers.
  • Rome, if you do not wish me to betray you, make enemies that I can hate!
    Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. Sabina, in Horace, act 1, sc. 1 (1641). Sabina, Roman by marriage, speaking when Rome fights her native Alba.

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  • I am Roman, alas, because Horace is Roman.
    Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. Sabina, in Horace, act 1, sc. 1 (1641). Sabina, Roman by marriage to Horace, distressed when Rome fights her native Alba.
  • Rome is no longer in Rome, it is here where I am.
    Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. Sertorius, in Sertorius, act 3, sc. 1 (1662). Sertorius describes his exile from a Rome fallen under tyranny.
  • To he who avenges a father, nothing is impossible.
    Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. Rodrigue, in The Cid, act 2, sc. 2 (1637).

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  • He who fears not death fears not a threat.
    Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. The Count, in The Cid, act 2, sc. 1 (1637).

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  • I can be forced to live without happiness, but I will never consent to live without honor.
    Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. The Count, in The Cid, act 2, sc. 1 (1637).

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  • Ambition displeases when it has been sated ... having reached the peak, it aspires to descend.
    Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. The Emperor Augustus, in Cinna, act 2, sc. 1 (1641). Augustus considers voluntary abdication.
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