Treasure Island

Quotations From RÉMY DE GOURMONT

 

  • 1.
    Man associates ideas not according to logic or verifiable exactitude, but according to his pleasure and interests. It is for this reason that most truths are nothing but prejudices.
    Rémy De Gourmont (1858-1915), French critic, novelist. repr. In Selected Writings, ed. and trans. by Glen S. Burne (1966). "The Dissociation of Ideas," (1899).
  • 2.
    To write well, to have style ... is to paint. The master faculty of style is therefore the visual memory. If a writer does not see what he describes—countrysides and figures, movements and gestures—how could he have a style, that is originality?
    Rémy De Gourmont (1858-1915), French critic, novelist. "The Problem of Style," Selected Writings (1902, trans. 1966).

    Read more quotations about / on: memory
  • 3.
    Aesthetic emotion puts man in a state favorable to the reception of erotic emotion.... Art is the accomplice of love. Take love away and there is no longer art.
    Rémy De Gourmont (1858-1915), French critic, novelist. repr. In Selected Writings, ed. and trans. by Glen S. Burne (1966). "Success and the Idea of Beauty," sect. 2, Le Chemin de Velours (1902).

    Read more quotations about / on: love
  • 4.
    The whole effort of a sincere man is to erect his personal impressions into laws.
    Rémy De Gourmont (1858-1915), French critic, novelist. Murry called this statement "the motto of a true criticism, conscious of its limitations and its strengths." Quoted in John Middleton Murry, "A Critical Credo," Countries of the Mind (1922).
  • 5.
    If the secret of being a bore is to tell all, the secret of pleasing is to say just enough to be—not understood, but divined.
    Rémy De Gourmont (1858-1915), French critic, novelist. repr. In Selected Writings, ed. and trans. by Glen S. Burne (1966). "On Style and Writing," sct. 6, La Culture des Idées (1900).
  • 6.
    The human mind is so complex and things are so tangled up with each other that, to explain a blade of straw, one would have to take to pieces an entire universe.... A definition is a sack of flour compressed into a thimble.
    Rémy De Gourmont (1858-1915), French critic, novelist. repr. In Selected Writings, ed. and trans. by Glen S. Burne (1966). "Glory and the Idea of Immortality," sct. 1, Le Chemin de Velours (1902).
  • 7.
    Man, in spite of his tendency towards mendacity, has a great respect for what he calls the truth. Truth is his staff in his voyage through life; commonplaces are the bread in his bag and the wine in his jug.
    Rémy De Gourmont (1858-1915), French critic, novelist. repr. In Selected Writings, ed. and trans. by Glen S. Burne (1966). "The Dissociation of Ideas," (1899).

    Read more quotations about / on: truth, respect, life
  • 8.
    Each man must grant himself the emotions that he needs and the morality that suits him.
    Rémy De Gourmont (1858-1915), French critic, novelist. repr. In Selected Writings, ed. and trans. by Glen S. Burne (1966). "Success and the Idea of Beauty," sct. 3, Le Chemin de Velours (1902).
  • 9.
    We live less and less, and we learn more and more. Sensibility is surrendering to intelligence.
    Rémy De Gourmont (1858-1915), French critic, novelist. repr. In Selected Writings, ed. and trans. by Glen S. Burne (1966). "The Value of Education," Le Chemin de Velours (1902).
  • 10.
    Life is a series of sensations connected to different states of consciousness.
    Rémy De Gourmont (1858-1915), French critic, novelist. repr. In Selected Writings, ed. and trans. by Glen S. Burne (1966). "The Value of Education," Le Chemin de Velours (1902).

    Read more quotations about / on: life
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