Quotations From RALPH WALDO EMERSON


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  • A man finds room in the few square inches of the face for the traits of all his ancestors; for the expression of all his history, and his wants.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Behavior," The Conduct of Life (1860).

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  • Society, to be sure, does not like this very well; it saith, Whoso goes to walk alone, accuses the whole world; he declares all to be unfit to be his companions; it is very uncivil, nay, insulting; Society will retaliate.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Speech, January 1842, at the Masonic Temple in Boston, repr. In The Dial (1843) and Nature, Addresses, and Lectures (1849). "The Transcendentalist," repr. in The Portable Emerson, ed. Carl Bode (1946, repr. 1981).

    Read more quotations about / on: alone, world
  • To the wise, therefore, a fact is true poetry, and the most beautiful of fables.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Nature, ch. 8 (1836, revised and repr. 1849).

    Read more quotations about / on: poetry, beautiful
  • There is a power in love to divine another's destiny better than that other can, and, by heroic engagements, hold him to his task.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Uses of Great Men," Representative Men (1850).

    Read more quotations about / on: destiny, power, love
  • Our relations to each other are oblique and casual.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Experience," Essays, Second Series (1844).
  • It is very certain that each man carries in his eye the exact indication of his rank in the immense scale of men, and we are always learning to read it. A complete man should need no auxiliaries to his personal presence.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Behavior," The Conduct of Life (1860).
  • Literature is the effort of man to indemnify himself for the wrongs of his condition.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. The Dial, vol. 12, 1841. "Walter Savage Landor," The Natural History of Intellect (1893).
  • A scholar is a candle which the love and desire of all men will light.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Society and Solitude," Society and Solitude (1870).

    Read more quotations about / on: light, love
  • The whole constitution of property on its present tenures, is injurious, and its influence on persons deteriorating and degrading.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Politics," Essays, Second Series (1844).
  • Fashion understands itself; good-breeding and personal superiority of whatever country readily fraternize with those of every other. The chiefs of savage tribes have distinguished themselves in London and Paris, by the purity of their tournure.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Manners," Essays, Second Series (1844).

    Read more quotations about / on: paris, london
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