Treasure Island

Quotations From RICHARD STEELE

 

  • 1.
    He who comes into Assemblies only to gratifie his Curiosity, and not to make a Figure, enjoys the Pleasures of Retirement in a[n] ...exquisite Degree.
    Richard Steele (1672-1729), British author. The Spectator, No. 4 (1711).

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  • 2.
    To be exempt from the Passions with which others are tormented, is the only pleasing Solitude.
    Richard Steele (1672-1729), British author. The Spectator, No. 4 (1711).

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  • 3.
    I have always observed that Women, whether out of a nicer Regard to their Honour, or what other Reason I cannot tell, are more sensibly touched with those general Aspersions which are cast upon their Sex, than Men are by what is said of theirs.
    Richard Steele (1672-1729), British author. The Spectator, No. 11 (1711).

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  • 4.
    I do not know that I meet, in any of my Walks, Objects which move both my Spleen and Laughter so effectually, as those Young Fellows ... who rise early for no other Purpose but to publish their Laziness.
    Richard Steele (1672-1729), British author. The Spectator, No. 49 (1711).

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  • 5.
    It has been from Age to Age an Affectation to love the Pleasure of Solitude, among those who cannot possibly be supposed qualified for passing Life in that Manner.
    Richard Steele (1672-1729), British author. The Spectator, No. 264 (1711).

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  • 6.
    The general Mistake among us in the Educating of our Children, is, That in our Daughters we take Care of their Persons and neglect their Minds; in our Sons, we are so intent upon adorning their Minds, that we wholly neglect their Bodies.
    Richard Steele (1672-1729), British author. The Spectator, No. 66 (1711).

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  • 7.
    [I]t is a civil Cowardice to be backward in asserting what you ought to expect, as it is a military Fear to be slow in attacking when it is your Duty.
    Richard Steele (1672-1729), British author. The Spectator, No. 2 (1711).

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  • 8.
    It is an endless and frivolous Pursuit to act by any other Rule than the Care of satisfying our own Minds in what we do.
    Richard Steele (1672-1729), British author. The Spectator, No. 4 (1711).
  • 9.
    An Author, when he first appears in the World, is very apt to believe it has nothing to think of but his Performances.
    Richard Steele (1672-1729), British author. The Spectator, No. 4 (1711).

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  • 10.
    I have often observed, there is not a Man breathing who does not differ from all other Men, as much in the Sentiments of his Mind, as the Features of his Face.
    Richard Steele (1672-1729), British author. The Spectator, No. 264 (1711).
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