Quotations From SAMUEL BECKETT

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  • 131.
    To think, when one is no longer young, when one is not yet old, that one is no longer young, that one is not yet old, that is perhaps something.
    Samuel Beckett (1906-1989), Irish dramatist, novelist. Watt (1953).
  • 132.
    How time flies when one has fun!
    Samuel Beckett (1906-1989), Irish dramatist, novelist. Vladimir, in Waiting for Godot, p. 49, Grove Press (1954).

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  • 133.
    The mind betrays the treacherous eyes and the treacherous word their treacheries.
    Samuel Beckett (1906-1989), Irish dramatist, novelist. The narrator, in Ill Seen Ill Said, p. 48, Grove Press (1981).
  • 134.
    Love requited is a short circuit.
    Samuel Beckett (1906-1989), Irish dramatist, novelist. First published in 1938. Neary, in Murphy, p. 5, Grove Press (1959).

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  • 135.
    Make sense who may. I switch off.
    Samuel Beckett (1906-1989), Irish dramatist, novelist. Bam, in What Where (1984).
  • 136.
    The pendulum oscillates between these two terms: Suffering—that opens a window on the real and is the main condition of the artistic experience, and Boredom ... that must be considered as the most tolerable because the most durable of human evils.
    Samuel Beckett (1906-1989), Irish dramatist, novelist. First published in 1931. Proust, p. 16, Grove Press (1957).
  • 137.
    I am so glad you have been able to preserve the text in all of its impurity.
    Samuel Beckett (1906-1989), Irish dramatist, novelist. "Beckett's Letters on Endgame," p. 185, The Village Voice Reader, Doubleday (1962). Of Endgame, in a letter to Alan Schneider dated April 30, 1957.
  • 138.
    Habit is a compromise effected between an individual and his environment.
    Samuel Beckett (1906-1989), Irish dramatist, novelist. First published in 1931. Proust, p. 7, Grove Press (1957).
  • 139.
    Art has always been this—pure interrogation, rhetorical question less the rhetoric—whatever else it may have been obliged by social reality to appear.
    Samuel Beckett (1906-1989), Irish dramatist, novelist. "Denis Devlin," p. 289, Transition, 27 (April-May 1938).
  • 140.
    With what reason remains he reasons ill.
    Samuel Beckett (1906-1989), Irish dramatist, novelist. The narrator, in Company, p. 12, Grove Press (1980).
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