Quotations From SAMUEL BUTLER


» More about Samuel Butler on Poemhunter

 

  • Rare virtues are like rare plants or animals, things that have not been able to hold their own in the world. A virtue to be serviceable must, like gold, be alloyed with some commoner but more durable metal.
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. The Way of All Flesh, ch. 19 (1903).

    Read more quotations about / on: world
  • Young people have a marvelous faculty of either dying or adapting themselves to circumstances.
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1903. Ernest Pontifex, or The Way of All Flesh, ch. 6, p. 25, Houghton Mifflin (1964).

    Read more quotations about / on: dying, people
  • When the righteous man turneth away from his righteousness that he hath committed and doeth that which is neither lawful nor quite right, he will generally be found to have gained in amiability what he has lost in holiness.
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. Notebooks, ch. 2 (1912).

    Read more quotations about / on: lost
  • I really do not see much use in exalting the humble and meek; they do not remain humble and meek long when they are exalted.
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 220 (1951).
  • It is our less conscious thoughts and our less conscious actions which mainly mould our lives and the lives of those who spring from us.
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. The Way of All Flesh, ch. 5 (1903).

    Read more quotations about / on: spring
  • Death is only a larger kind of going abroad.
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 144, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).

    Read more quotations about / on: death
  • It is immoral to get drunk because the headache comes after the drinking, but if the headache came first and the drunkenness afterwards, it would be moral to get drunk.
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 101 (1951).
  • And bid the devil take the hin'most.
    Samuel Butler (1612-1680), British poet. eds. John Wilders and Hugh de Quehen (1973). Hudibras, pt. 1, cto. 2, l. 633 (1663).
  • To live is like to love—all reason is against it, and all healthy instinct for it.
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 283, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).

    Read more quotations about / on: love
  • There is such a thing as doing good that evil may come.
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 282, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).

    Read more quotations about / on: evil
[Hata Bildir]