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Quotations From SAMUEL BUTLER


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  • Critics generally come to be critics not by reason of their fitness for this, but of their unfitness for anything else. Books should be tried by a judge and jury as though they were a crime, and counsel should be heard on both sides.
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 111, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).
  • To know whether you are enjoying a piece of music or not you must see whether you find yourself looking at the advertisements of Pears' soap at the end of the libretto.
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 229, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).

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  • Union may be strength, but it is mere blind brute strength unless wisely directed.
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 197 (1951).

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  • What is faith but a kind of betting or speculation after all? It should be, "I bet that my Redeemer liveth."
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. Samuel Butler's Notebooks (first publ. 1912, 1951).

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  • The world will only, in the end, follow those who have despised as well as served it.
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. Samuel Butler's Notebooks (1951).

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  • Quickness comes from long sustained effort after rightness, and comes unsought. It never comes from effort after quickness.
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 170, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).
  • The great pleasure of a dog is that you may make a fool of yourself with him and not only will he not scold you, but he will make a fool of himself too.
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. Notebooks, "Higgledy-Piggledy," (1912).

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  • Truth: It should not be absolutely lost sight of but it should not be talked about.
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 253, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).

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  • The best liar is he who makes the smallest amount of lying go the longest way.
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. The Way of All Flesh, ch. 39 (1903).
  • Very useless things we neglect, till they become old and useless enough to be put in Museums: and so very important things we study till, when they become important enough, we ignore them—and rightly.
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 45, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).
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