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Quotations From SAMUEL JOHNSON

» More about Samuel Johnson on Poemhunter

 

  • 171.
    Lawyers know life practically. A bookish man should always have them to converse with.
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Said to the lawyer Oliver Edwards. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, April 17, 1778 (1791).

    Read more quotations about / on: life
  • 172.
    I know not, Madam, that you have a right, upon moral principles, to make your readers suffer so much.
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, 1763 (1791). To Mrs. Thomas Sheridan, on publication of her novel Memoirs of Mrs. Sydney Biddulph.
  • 173.
    The mind is refrigerated by interruption; the thoughts are diverted from the principal subject; the reader is weary, he suspects not why; and at last throws away the book, which he has too diligently studied.
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. repr. In Works of Samuel Johnson, vol. 7, ed. Arthur Sherbo (1968). Preface to Shakespeare (1765). Of textual notes.
  • 174.
    Money and time are the heaviest burdens of life, and ... the unhappiest of all mortals are those who have more of either than they know how to use.
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. repr. in Works of Samuel Johnson, vol. 2, eds. W.J. Bate, John M. Bullitt, and L.F. Powell (1963). The Idler, no. 30, Universal Chronicle (London, November 11, 1758).

    Read more quotations about / on: money, time, life
  • 175.
    Perhaps man is the only being that can properly be called idle.
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. repr. in Works of Samuel Johnson, Yale Edition, vol. 2, eds. W.J. Bate, John M. Bullitt and L.F. Powell (1963). The Idler, no. 1, Universal Chronicle (London, April 15, 1758). "As peace is the end of war," Johnson wrote, "so to be idle is the ultimate purpose of the busy."
  • 176.
    A fly, Sir, may sting a stately horse and make him wince; but one is but an insect, and the other is a horse still.
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, vol. 1 (1934). Note to entry for March 20, 1776.

    Read more quotations about / on: horse, fly
  • 177.
    To be idle and to be poor have always been reproaches, and therefore every man endeavours with his utmost care to hide his poverty from others, and his idleness from himself.
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. repr. in The Works of Samuel Johnson, vol. 2, eds. W.J. Bate, John M. Bullitt and L.F. Powell (1963). Idler (London, Aug. 5, 1758), no. 17.

    Read more quotations about / on: poverty
  • 178.
    Questioning is not the mode of the conversation among gentlemen.
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, March 25, 1776 (1791).
  • 179.
    A short letter to a distant friend is, in my opinion, an insult like that of a slight bow or cursory salutation—a proof of unwillingness to do much, even where there is a necessity of doing something.
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Letter, June 10, 1761. Published in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson (1791).

    Read more quotations about / on: friend
  • 180.
    There is no private house in which people can enjoy themselves so well as at a capital tavern.... No, Sir; there is nothing which has yet been contrived by man by which so much happiness is produced as by a good tavern or inn.
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, March 21, 1776 (1791).

    Read more quotations about / on: happiness, house, people
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